Author Archives: Summit Estate

Addiction and Depression, and Apps and Podcasts

Ask someone why people take drugs, and they may say to try and escape or get relief from the emotional pain they’re feeling, or because they’re depressed. That may be two ways of saying the same thing. You may have also heard people question what comes first. Does someone turn to drinking or other drugs because they’re depressed, or does addiction make someone depressed?  The Mayo Clinic says that alcohol abuse or use of recreational drugs is one of the factors that seems to “increase the risk of developing or triggering depression.” CBS News has a Q&A on the subject with the Assistant Medical Director of a treatment center associated with McLean Hospital who says “there are a number of drugs that people use and abuse that can directly affect the brain and cause depression. For example, marijuana slows down brain functioning and diminishes cognitive abilities and can cause depression in a significant number of individuals. Alcohol can do the same thing. Cocaine tends to elevate people’s moods, but when they come off it, they often experience a crash into depression.”

Alcohol and Drug Treatment Programs 

In any event, Richard Tate, the co-author of “Ending Addiction for Good,” says in Psychology Today that depression is probably the most common co-occurring disorder among substance abusers.  The Mayo Clinic website also points out there are different types of depression, various causes, and several types of medications to treat it.Depression may require long-term treatment,” the organization notes, “but don’t get discouraged. Most people with depression feel better with medication, psychotherapy or both.” Depression is a serious condition and one blog post is not sufficient for thoroughly delving into such an involved disease. However, some people find that besides therapy and medication, apps and podcasts can be helpful.  A few are below.

alcohol and drug treatment Programs

 Apps and Podcasts

 One woman wrote about her depression on Buzzfeed and mentioned that listening to podcasts on mental health work for her because they let her and others know they’re not alone in feeling sad. They also allow for listening in private, where there is no stigma about mental health conditions. One podcast she mentioned is The Mental Illness Happy Hour, which has interviews with comedians, doctors and others that explore mental illness, trauma, addiction, and negative thinking. Don’t let the slick title turn you off before you try it; the podcaster is a comedian. Another writer has compiled a list of apps designed to make people feel happier, such as Aura, which offers Mindfulness Meditations, short stories, music, sounds of nature, and a gratitude journal, for example.

 Regarding mindful meditation, the July issue of Health magazine offers three apps:

Headspace, which teaches the basics of meditating at no cost, followed by for pay meditations from one to 20 minutes. There’s also Meditation Studio, advertised as having meditations for everyone, no matter their situation. Finally, Stop, Breathe, and Think allows you to log your daily meditation to track your practice. A dual diagnosis treatment organization offersApps for Addiction Recovery and Mental Health.” Here’s one that looks interesting:

Pacifica

 

For many, addiction is as much a symptom as it is an illness in and of itself. This makes addressing the core issues that may be fueling the need to escape a central part of recovery. For those with depression and/or anxiety, relief and support can be found through Pacifica. In addition to offering a mood tracker and guided meditations, this app uses principles based on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to help smooth over distorted thinking patterns and overcome anxiety by breaking it down into bite-sized daily challenges.

 

For more information on Summit Estate’s alcohol and drug treatment Programs please call (866) 569-9391, help is only a phone call away.

Let’s Talk about Drinking

With the opioid crisis still going strong, there’s a danger of problem drinking getting short shrift. If you’re the one who’s desperately trying to stay sober, or if you’re the one in four who has been personally touched by alcohol use disorder in your family, you know that we need to keep it in the public eye. It’s that important. To give people hope for recovery, and for funding for treatment and for research, and to educate people, to name a few reasons. Time Goes By is one of the many personal blogs that touches on drinking to excess. In one post, on Elders and Alcohol, the writer recalls growing up in the fifties when alcohol was such a big part of many people’s lives, and a more accepted part. The woman’s father had taught her to make all the popular drinks by the time she was 10, which would be unheard of today. In later years, she realized that her mother was a functional alcoholic who kept it in check at her day job, but made up for it evenings and weekends. She didn’t inherit the gene, the writer says, and doesn’t have a problem with alcohol.

Alcohol Addiction

A number of people felt the need to comment on the post. One believed there’s a similar emphasis on drinking today, as if it has never dissipated, from the media touting the latest craft beer to “paint and drink parties,” to people posting pictures of their drinks on social media. Others felt the need to testify about their personal experience, from abstaining to social drinking, to bringing one’s own beverages to events because the person was finally able to quit drinking and didn’t want to go back. The blog writer includes several excerpts from Medical News Today, a U.K. news site, about how moderate drinking is beneficial. She obviously hadn’t read the article that appeared before her post did—Federal Agency Courted Alcohol Industry to Fund Study on Benefits of Moderate Drinking. It concerns exactly what was spelled out in the headline. Not to cast aspersions on anyone or any study, but we need to research who is funding studies. The article revealed that some people involved “already believed that moderate alcohol is a good thing,” which is also not a good thing.  Luckily, another article, which followed that one, reported that the N.I.H would be investigating outreach to alcohol companies, or examining whether health officials violated government policy by soliciting donations to fund the study of moderate drinking. And following that, another, international study, found that adults should average no more than one drink a day—that many countries’ guidelines are too lenient. Yet according to that blog writer quoting Medical News Today, various studies indicated that light-to-moderate alcohol consumption may lower the risk of stroke in women, and regular, moderate wine drinking might reduce the risk of developing depression, and moderate wine and beer consumption reduces the risk of cardiovascular events.

Summit Estate's alcohol recovery centers

Alcohol Recovery Center

With all the reports about alcohol, it can be hard to determine what’s true regarding the claims. However, no one can argue that if a person doesn’t stop drinking, alcohol use disorder is extremely dangerous. People in recovery occasionally mention not knowing what to say when people ask why they’re not drinking. A person who wrote into a social etiquette column said that one co-worker said he missed drinking with the person, and asked if he wouldn’t have just one drink with him. The writer said that his recovery group suggested he didn’t owe anyone any answers. The columnist responded in line with the group—the writer had no duty to explain himself, especially if he were new in recovery. His message was to focus on himself and not waste energy fending off pals. But the columnist suggested that as time goes on, saying something like “Drinking didn’t agree with me” to acquaintances is good, but to family and close friends, it’s OK to share more of his struggle, which might even give him more allies than just his support group. For more information on alcohol addiction or Summit Estate’s alcohol recovery centers please contact  (866) 569-9391.

Opioid Protests, and an Imodium High? Who Would Believe It?

 Opioid dissent

 Americans have a long history of protesting when they don’t like something. It hasn’t been that long since Occupy Wall Street, the Parkland, Florida students, and the #MeToo campaigns, to name just three uprisings. But who would have thought there would be an actual protest against OxyContin? A lot has been written against Purdue Pharma, the drug’s manufacturer, but to actually take to the street over it? Well, it’s happened. Last month, Nan Goldin, a well-known photographer who was addicted to opioids herself once, led a demonstration at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, in a wing named for two Sackler brothers whose family owns the company. The group had a symbolic “die-in” there, marched through the halls and also gathered outside. Their goal was to get buy-in from cultural institutions not to accept money from the family, and to fund addiction treatment. They unfurled banners and scattered pill bottles labeled with the drug’s name and the Sackler name into a reflecting pool. MOMA is not the only museum the family has given money to, either.

 Opioid Protest

Previously, a small protest took place in November outside a VA medical center in Florida when six veterans marched outside to protest opioid deaths and show support for medical marijuana. They carried a casket draped in an American flag and then poured “hundreds of empty pill bottles inside the casket.” Most either had a personal story about opioids or knew someone who became addicted. One vet’s young daughter had died from a seizure and he believed she would had lived if she had access to marijuana for her genetic condition. Can you imagine if families that have lost loved ones due to opioids, or who have loved ones that have become addicted decided to them march en masse in major cities? And if those who became addicted themselves joined them and identified and put pressure on perpetrators to provide funding for treatment? That would be something to see. Some people think progress is being made in the fight against the opioid epidemic because a partnership has been established between the NIH and pharmaceutical companies to develop nonaddictive painkillers. But abuse-deterrent doesn’t mean less addictive at all, it simply means pills are harder to crush or do otherwise with for snorting or injecting them.

a drug treatment program

 Imodium

 Also in the category of “Will wonders never cease?”, it seems that Loperamide—Imodium A-D, the diarrhea stopper, has potential for abuse. If you’ve heard of Joe and Teresa Graedon, you may know they’re syndicated columnists with a health column (The People’s Pharmacy) in which they answer readers’ questions and comment on people’s concerns.  In their March column in The Seattle Times, a reader wrote in to say he or she has been taking Imodium for Irritable Bowel Syndrome for years, one pill a day, and it has been extremely helpful. The person doesn’t have to be near a bathroom shortly after eating. He or she was concerned because the FDA wants to limit the allowable amount to be sold over the counter to packs of eight pills, an amount good for two days. The writer is afraid that the price will go up and it will be difficult to get the amount he or she needs. (Sound familiar? Like the complaints from people who take opioids for legitimate pain and don’t abuse them, and are fearful that more stringent measures may mean they won’t be able to get what they need? Appears so.) The Graedons explain: “Some people have been using high doses….to ease opioid withdrawal symptoms; others have abused the drug in order to get high.” One problem with the latter behavior is that it may result in irregular heart rhythms or cardiac arrest. Who knew an IBS medicine could be used for other than stopping diarrhea?

For more information contact Summit Estate, a drug treatment program, at (866) 569-9391.  

Nutrition and Recovery

When people suffering from addiction enter treatment and stop using, they often develop a more intense interest in food – often sugary, high-carb, or high-fat choices like doughnuts or mac and cheese. Usually, before they know it, they’re packing on the pounds. Those who have abused alcohol and other drugs likely had a poor relationship with food at the same time, eating whatever pleased them, and some were malnourished. Addiction experts know that what these people are really doing is substituting one drug for another. Both substances make the brain’s pleasure and reward centers light up, which explains why food takes on added importance for them. Many treatment centers promote the idea of healthy eating, and treating people with substance use disorders holistically, but it’s an integral part of the program at Summit Estate Recovery Center. Angela Goncalves, Director of Operations at Summit, even brought a cookbook targeted to those in recovery from her former center, Malibu Beach Recovery Center, to Summit. “I was the Director of Operations at [the former] Malibu Beach Recovery Center from September 2007 to September 2014,” she says. “I saw how effective our diet was for clients struggling to recover from drugs and alcohol. The food was not only delicious, but it boosted dopamine levels.  When I became Director of Operations at Summit Estate Recovery Center in the Silicon Valley, I immediately distributed copies of our cookbook, then known as Dopamine for Dinner, to the chef and staff. It’s the basis of the wonderful meals we serve, and our clients look and feel super healthy.” The basis of the cookbook is the approach to food taken by a French executive in the pharmaceutical industry who developed a diet for himself based on low-glycemic foods. It’s noteworthy that even the chefs who cook the recipes — and contributed to the book — noticed how much healthier the clients look since consuming the foods in the book. There’s this from the Introduction: “….[A]ddicts of all sorts (illicit drugs, prescription drugs and/or alcohol), can recover more easily by following a version of [this diet]. The goal was not weight loss, but regaining emotional balance and health, restoring chronically low dopamine levels and expediting brain repair. The diet also makes recovery more probable for diabetics.” and “Although we call this a ‘diet,’ his is not a diet in the traditional sense. There are no calories to count, and we don’t ask that our clients memorize the values of the Glycemic Index. There are no long lists of forbidden ingredients. Rather the recipes are based on an abundance of allowable products that will enrich and enhance culinary possibilities, and may introduce ingredients that had not been a habitual staple in their nutritional habits.” The cookbook is also for alumni of the two programs (MBRC and Summit), and the “hundreds of thousands of Americans just like them – alcoholics and addicts seeking to achieve long-term recovery through a lifestyle change.” Note: The Barnes and Noble version of Dopamine for Dinner (now called the Malibu Beach Recovery Diet Cookbook by Joan Borsten) can be purchased from Amazon at this link: https://tinyurl.com/ydafq33h

 

 

White Collar Professionals and Addiction

Often, the stereotype of someone suffering from alcohol or other substance use disorder is that they’re down and out, barely functioning most of the time, and always looking for the next drink or fix. Yet if you’re at all knowledgeable about addiction, you know that addiction affects people at all socioeconomic levels, including executives in the corner office and other white collar professionals.

 

These employees often work in highly stressful jobs, such as in high-tech companies, where much is expected of them. They also fall prey to the stigma of addiction, so the fear of losing their job is strong.

 

Denial is strong at this level, and the excuses are many.  Perhaps the most common is that they don’t have a problem. Some people say they deserve to drink or take drugs because of all they’re dealing with, or even that they can do their job better with drugs. (I interviewed one woman addicted to oxycodone who said she took a handful of pills every day just to feel normal.) Others say they could never take time from work for treatment.Tyler Fitzgerald, Clinical Director of Summit Estate, says his experience has been that most companies are incredibly supportive of people getting help, especially in Silicon Valley. “What they won’t put up with is the absenteeism, the hangovers, and the outbursts,” adds Jon Heller, Summit Estate’s Admissions Director.

 

You may have done some research and learned that effective treatment facilities group people with similar needs for the best results. A teenage boy does not have the same rehabilitation needs as a high-level executive, for example. Summit Estate caters to white collar professionals with stressful jobs. “We’re the non-luxury luxury treatment center,” says Fitzgerald. “This is not the kind of place where people come and are pampered and get to sleep until noon and have breakfast brought to them. We don’t emphasize the things that aren’t necessary. We focus on real treatment for real people.”

 

Similarly, he explains, the reintegration program is an intensive daily program that can be built around people’s work schedules, if need be. “People continue working with their therapist and their treatment team while being reintegrated into the community and learn how to deal with the everyday stresses of work.” 

 

Even during the program, people who absolutely need to keep in touch with work can be accommodated. “What we do is take away excuses not to come,” says Fitzgerald.

 

On Psych Central, Dr. David Sack explains that addicts may think they’re “getting away with” their addition quite awhile before taking action:  “High-functioning addicts are masters of disguise whose struggles with drugs and alcohol may go unnoticed for years, often with increasingly severe consequences. A … position of power at work … may cushion them from the consequences of their drug use, while a sense of self-importance or belief that they can resolve their own problems may prevent them from seeking treatment.

 

 

Fitzgerald offers the perfect conclusion for this post with an apt observation about treatment: “Our clients could be at their bottom. They could have been called in at work and spoken to about their performance, or perhaps other people have noticed they’ve been intoxicated or are increasingly missing deadlines or work. Everyone’s bottom is the same — you’re up against a wall, and the rug’s about to be pulled out from under you and you’re going to be exposed. Our clients often come to us in a state of panic that they’re going to lose their job; this is the time to save it.” 

Overcoming Abuse with a Drug Rehab Program

Drug addiction is a very serious condition that is very hard to overcome. When you abuse of any type of narcotics, it’s highly likely that you have changed the natural chemical balance in your brain. In this case, attending a drug rehab program is essential to find a successful solution.

Chemical imbalance can increase dependence on drugs, and cause you to need larger and larger doses to reach the same high as you continue using. On the other hand, when your body is deprived of the drug for an extended period of time, you may suffer a wide range of negative side effects, which can include but not limited to cold sweats, headaches and shaking.

Overcoming drug abuse and addiction is a difficult and intricate process since drug abuse affects your body both physically and mentally. When overcome by drug abuse, you are unable to think and reason properly which can result in thinking that your drug use is not a problem. Once you have accepted that drug abuse is a problem, it’s extremely difficult to cope and deal with the withdrawal symptoms.

Basic Steps to Recovery

There are a few steps required to start the journey in overcoming drug abuse:

  1. Recognize the problem

This very first step in overcoming a problem is always recognizing that you have a problem and accepting that your actions or behavior is problematic.

This can be a very difficult thing to do, especially after a long time of qualifying the behavior as a choice that you can stop at any time you choose. It takes a great amount of strength to accept the reality of your problem and do something about it.

  1. A want for change

Once you accept that you have a problem, the next step is wanting to change your destructive behavior. Without making excuses, you need to take a good look at your life from an outsider perspective.

Look at the costs involved in your addiction, which are not limited to finances, but also include your health and relationships. Think about the advice you would give yourself if you were an outsider looking in at your life. 

Overcoming Abuse with a Drug Rehab Program

  1. Get help

As if it’s not difficult enough to recognize that you have a problem, approaching someone else to ask for help is just as difficult, especially admitting that you can’t handle the problem on your own. There is a huge misconception that asking for help is a sign of weakness.

In fact, asking for help is a sign of great strength and that you have the willpower to get overcome the abuse and become even stronger. The next step would be to find the best drug addiction treatment center available for you.

  1. Find professional help

The only way to successfully overcome drug abuse is to seek professional help. Once you have the support of friends and family, consulting with a professional will give you the facilities and tools to help with addiction. Professionals are well-equipped with the right tools and knowledge to help you detox your body from the drugs to eventually overcome addiction. Once you have dealt with the previous steps, you will be able to start removing drugs from your system and learn how to cope with a new drug-free lifestyle.

Find the proper Drug Rehab Program

At Summit Estate, we have a team of professionals dedicated to problems like the one you’re going through now. Give us a call at (866) 569-9391 to know more about how we can help you change your life for good.

How do Alcohol Recovery Centers Help People With Their Addiction?

Many people will write about addiction and alcohol recovery centers from the perspective of those who were/are addicted. No man is an island though, and the people who are friends and family of an addicted person are also affected by his or her situation. Whether a sibling, parent or close friend, the pain of the abuser will affect you too, no one enjoys seeing someone they love self-implode.

Level of Risk

Drug dependency is always dangerous, but some drugs are much more dangerous than others (think Heroin, Methamphetamine etc.). You need to gauge the risks to the individual before deciding on the best approach to helping them.

This will often start the process of ‘’intervention’’; this is where those that care for the abuser take measures to try to save the life of the abuser. This will often entail a prolonged stay at a psychological medical Centre as well as a drug rehab program.

Out of your hands

You cannot fix someone. The only person who can stop the drug abuser is the addict themselves. You need to realize this before trying to help, if someone does not want to change or is unable to, no amount of help and sacrifice will help. In some cases, and this is painful to hear, you may need to cut your losses so to speak.

When they do want help…

The key thing one can do is just be there for the person you care. Understand that the recovering addict is going to have good and bad days, some days will be filled with cravings or other signs of withdrawal, other days it will feel like having the old person back. Being patient is vital, setting clear boundaries and not getting angry is as important as the time you give to the loved one.

How do Alcohol Recovery Centers Help People With Their Addiction

You can’t do it alone

Sometimes the scale of the problem will be too great, in most cases, it is desirable that a group of people who care for the abuse intervene, this enables a shared responsibility as well as helping manage more practical aspects such as allocating time slots to help take care of the abuser through recovery.

The more people that help, the better, it shows the addict that they still have a place in the world and people who care for them.

The Long and Winding Road

Most of us know abusers in our life, whether it is known to us or not is a different matter entirely. Communication and trust are key, even in circumstances where the abuser may have hurt us when one decides to help you must commit to it.

Circumstance change when the person does not wish to be helped. But for those addicts that wish to change help should be provided by a loving support network.

This can be a lifelong commitment. It is up to you as an individual to decide if it is worth the sacrifice. Summit Estate can help all the way through the rehab process. Call (866) 569-9391 for more information about our programs and how we can help you.

 

Helping to Stop Relapse at Bay Area Recovery

When interventions are successful, a process of Bay Area recovery is started. It is vital that some support network exists and that the network provides positive encouragement for the recovering addict. For a person going through relapse, a change in mindset is needed. Relapsing is not a sign of failure. It is a sign that current treatment methods need to be tweaked or changed so that the abuse can stop again.

Around half of people who enter rehab will relapse at some point, whether in two weeks or 30 years, the point is to be available and help where and how you can.

Find the best course of treatment (and stick to it!)

This will often be done by the Medical Detox / drug rehab program; however, it is vital to help the recovering person to stick to the schedule. More so, if the treatment is not as effective as desired, you as a loved one are often one of the first to notice any regression in the addicts’ behavior.  Being alert to changes in behavior and mood can often head off an ‘’episode’’.

A change of lifestyle

Finding out what caused it is the first step to long-term recovery. For some recovering addicts, it was often people or places that would trigger the need for whatever drug they were abusing. Reducing these triggers as much as possible exponentially increases the likely success of a rehab regime.

Reducing the triggers is one thing, however, situations will arise naturally where the recovering abuser will be tempted to use drugs again. In these situations, being available to distract or help the person may be vital, at the same time you could also help take them to get more professional help if needed.

Helping to Stop Relapse in Bay Area Recovery

Prepare for the worst.

Hope for the best but prepare for the worst. Accept that relapse may happen and have a plan for if/when it does.

Having a plan of action that the person in recovery agrees to is also just as important, often the abuser will recognize that they will not be in ‘’headspace’’ to make rational decisions. It may even be necessary to have ‘’power of attorney’’ for the person assigned to you, though this is only done in exceptional circumstances.

Be there!

Most importantly is that you make yourself available! Having a proper support network is vital to a person’s recovery. Every recovering addict will have moments of weakness, getting involved can often be the difference between a bad few days and a death spiral back to addiction.

Knowing that others care for them and are willing to help with their problems can make all the difference to an abuser in the internal fight between substance dependence and the desire to be drug-free. Call Summit Estate at (866) 569-9391 to learn how we can help you win that battle.

Avoid High-Risk Situations When you’re In North Bay Recovery Center

One of the greatest challenges when attending a North Bay Recovery Center is that rehab never really ends. When you have been addicted and want to recover, embracing a substance-free life is not easy. It is usually a process that includes some relapses. This may seem discouraging but there are ways for you to recognize risky situations and develop strategies to cope with them. 

High-risk situations

The situations with the highest risk are those in which you often used your substance of choice before and will be highly tempted to use again. These situations are the most difficult to deal with.

Underlying reasons that can cause relapse

You are most at risk of relapse if you don’t follow the strategies you know will help you to recover but put yourself in high-risk situations instead. Some of your reasons for doing this may be:

The difficulty with processing emotions – this is often what led to the addiction in the first place. You use when you are frustrated, sad, angry, depressed, lonely, nervous, guilty or bored. You have to learn how to manage your emotions without needing a mood-altering substance. Emotional coping skills can be learned and therapy can help you to acquire these skills.

Feeling deprived – sometimes the cost of recovery just feels as though it’s too high. You may feel that everyone else is allowed to have fun except you and that the constant vigilance is a burden that’s too hard to bear. You have to find a way to put the reward of a lifetime of positive experiences ahead of the reward of temporary relief.

Testing your control – you may reach the point where you feel that you are in control and you can afford to let go ‘just a bit’. Unfortunately, this usually escalates and you relapse. You have to get to the point where you can resist that urge to test your self-control.
Avoid High-Risk Situations When you’re In North Bay Recovery Center

Managing your risk triggers

You are able to remove yourself from specific situations likely to lead to a risk of relapse if you recognize them immediately.

Being in a “using” situation – this may be inadvertent. You may be at a party where someone suddenly pulls out drugs. You need to leave and rudeness is not an issue here – it’s your life and sobriety that’s at stake.

Not having a support system – you need to have sober friends you can call on when you feel the urge to use. They are able to talk you through the situation and help you to stick to your goals. Attending support group meetings on a regular basis is a great key to maintaining sobriety. It is too difficult to go it alone.

Giving in to cravings – cravings take time to disappear and can reassert themselves at unexpected times. These cravings often don’t last for too long and you can deal with them with the right mental focus. It helps to plan ahead how to handle them. You may decide to exercise, for instance, rather than giving in to cravings.     

For more information about Summit Estate rehab programs, call (866) 569-9391.

California Rehab Centers can Change Your Life Quality

Recovery is extremely difficult but it can offer you the opportunity to change your life. Addicted individuals will use a drug of choice to help deal with their problems. This means that they often lack the skills needed to handle difficult situations in a recovery situation. In this case, California rehab centers come in handy to make a real change in life.

It takes time, commitment and hard work to learn how to deal with what life brings your way while you are trying to stay sober. Addiction does not necessarily have to lock you into an endless cycle of destructive behavior. Many individuals have proved that it is possible to recover and change.

Be honest

Addiction involves lying to yourself and others. You use alcohol or drugs to escape from your emotions. It’s not easy to face up to these emotions but it has to be done if you want to recover. You have the opportunity to find out who you are without the crutch you have been using to cope with them.  This will bring you to a better understanding of yourself and what lead to your addiction in the first place. And it’s an important step forward at the moment you decide to have a private drug treatment.

Be present

We all know about taking one day at a time. This is actually talking about being in the present moment instead of living in the past or the future. You cannot afford to carry your guilt with you and worry about your past or be anxious about how the future will work out for you. This just causes despair. Struggles need to be handled as they arise. If you face each issue as it arises, you will be less overwhelmed and will be able to take one step at a time. 

California Rehab Centers

Be committed

Recovery requires commitment. Successful recovery depends on being committed to the idea of building a new, positive life for yourself and making this your reward for staying sober instead of the temporary reward that comes from using drugs or alcohol.

Be thankful

Come to the realization that if you have been able to overcome addiction, you can overcome any other struggles that come your way. Using alcohol or drugs only temporarily numbs your pain but creates more struggles in the long run.   Facing up to life’s difficulties can be a learning experience. Everyone has struggles in their lives and overcoming them can help you to become a stronger person. 

Be pro-active

If you fill your free time with healthy activities, you give yourself the best chance of staying sober. When you’re in treatment, your time is dedicated to what supports your recovery. Once out of treatment it may be hard to keep that momentum and it helps to establish a healthy routine that includes some stress-relieving exercise. 

If you are not really committed to changing and others have coerced you into it, you are more likely to fail. You will succeed when you realize that your addiction interferes with building a happy life and when you develop the confidence that you can change. When you want to change badly enough, you are able to face the challenges and remain strong. 

Summit Estate can provide you with the help you’re looking for. Please call (866) 569-9391 for more information about our programs and locations.