Category Archives: Addiction

What to Expect from Alcohol Recovery Centers Today

Alcohol addiction is a far-reaching disease and does not discriminate. It does not matter if you are rich or poor, what race or religion you are, or where you live; once alcohol addiction takes hold of you, it can completely disrupt your life in every way and lead you spiraling down. Overcoming an addiction like this is far from an easy thing to do and takes work and dedication on your part. Luckily, there are quality facilities available today that can provide you with the level of help you need. The alcohol recovery centers available offer the system you need to be part of to recover successfully.

Centers are There for Support

Going through addiction alone and fighting it can be a difficult uphill battle that few can win. That is why rehab facilities and recovery centers are so important today. Centers can provide the support system that clients need at this most difficult time in life. A good center gives you the medical care you need to detox and overcome the physical addiction your body is dealing with while also providing you with the emotional and psychological support that you need most right now to better understand what you are going through and how you can gain the strength and courage you need to fight and move forward.

recovery centers in Northern California

Centers with the Best Approaches

Many of the alcohol recovery centers of the past all took the same approach to helping people with alcohol addiction, focusing on the basic programs and assuming they would work well for everyone. Methodologies, techniques, and tools have grown and changed over the years and provide us with better, more patient-focused programs that meet the needs of the individual. This approach gives centers the flexibility to try different therapies and approaches to touch clients in the areas of their lives that they need help the most.

One of the Top Centers Available

If you are looking at alcohol recovery centers in Northern California for yourself or for a loved one so that you can get the help you need, please consider contacting us here at Summit Estate Recovery Center. Our facility is among the finest you will find in the country and offers the facility, professionals, and treatment methods that encourage and facilitate recovery. You can learn more about us by reading our website, and you can contact us at 866-569-9391 if you have questions or need advice about getting help for addiction.

Choosing a Bay Area Rehabilitation Center

For those that are struggling with addiction or have a loved one caught up in drug abuse or alcohol abuse, finding a rehab center to turn to for help can be one of the most important decisions you make in your life. Selecting the right rehab center can be the difference for you between a long and successful recovery or falling back and deeper into addiction and abuse. It is worth the time and effort to consider facilities that provide the best care possible, and when you are choosing a Bay Area rehabilitation center, there are important factors to consider that can help you make the best choice.

Look at the Staff at the Center

An important factor in selecting a center for treatment is to know something about the staff available at the center. Many centers today find themselves understaffed, with a very high client to staff ratio. You want a location that offers a lower ratio so that you know you or your loved one is going to get the attention and support that is needed. Look to see what the staff is like, the type of professionals that are available to provide medical care, therapy and the like so you can determine if they can offer you the level of care needed.

Choosing a Bay Area Rehabilitation Center

Look at the Treatment Plans of the Center

When choosing any Bay area rehabilitation center, you want to take a close look to see what type of treatment plans are available to clients. You want to select a location that offers varied and personalized treatment plans so you can be sure you or your loved one get the best help possible. Different facilities offer different treatments, with some only offering outpatient or inpatient programs, while others offer a selection.

The Bay Area Center to Consider

If you are seeking a Bay Area rehabilitation center to help with addiction, consider contacting us here at Summit Estate Recovery Center. We offer one of the finest facilities in Northern California and have the experienced, caring staff and the treatment programs that can provide the specialized care that clients need. You can find out more about us by reading about our facilities and programs here on our website, or you can give us a call at 866-569-9391 and speak with a team member who can answer your questions and provide you with the assistance you need to get you started.

 

The Help Available at the Summit Rehab Center

Drug or alcohol addiction destroys lives and families each day. The longer you or a loved one suffer from an addiction, the harder it may become to overcome the problem and reclaim what has been lost in life. If you or someone you care about it is struggling with an addiction, you know the devastation it can cause, and you want to do whatever you can to get the person you love the help they need. It is important for you to know that help is available here at our Summit Rehab Center, where we work with individuals dealing with addiction in a highly effective manner.

Providing Personalized Care at Our Center

Here at Summit Rehab Center, we are the best drug and alcohol treatment center available in Northern California. We understand that each person deals with addiction differently and that there is no “cookie cutter” approach to treatment that works for everyone. We craft a personalized treatment plan for each individual and have a high staff to client ratio so that you are sure to get the attention you need and deserve for your treatment. This approach for much greater success in treatment and recovery.

The Help Available at the Summit Rehab Center

Care That Goes Beyond the Standards

The care we provide for each client at Summit Estate Recovery Center goes beyond the norm that you may find at other treatment facilities. We start working with our clients from the time that an intervention may be necessary. From that time forward, through admission, detox treatments, and therapy sessions, right through the necessary aftercare, we will be there for you to help you so that you can have the best chance at a successful recovery. We offer several program options, including outpatient treatment and a residential rehab facility, so that you have the options before you that work best for your situation.

Talk to Us about Our Rehab Center

If you would like to learn more about us at Summit Estate Recovery Center and see how our Summit Rehab Center can help you or a loved one, please take the time to review our website and take a visual tour of our facility. If you have any questions or need any help, we have staff available to speak with you 24 hours a day, seven days a week so you can get the help you need. You can phone us at 866-569-9391 to begin the process and learn what we can do to help you.

Inpatient and Outpatient Alcohol Treatment Programs in the Bay Area

Alcohol is something socially accepted and available everywhere. Maybe for this reason, it’s one of the most abused substances in the U.S. Unfortunately, sometimes it’s even glamorized or encouraged through media. For this reason, many people don’t fully understand the danger that comes along with alcohol abuse.

Summit Estate Recovery Center offers inpatient and outpatient alcohol treatment programs in the Bay Area. Their highly trained experts use tried and true methods in the treatment of alcoholism. The institution offers luxurious locations in order to provide their patients a comfortable, private environment. Such beautiful locations, along with the proper treatment, gives them enough encouragement and stimulation to finally beat the bottle.

inpatient and outpatient alcohol treatment programs in the Bay Area

Different kind of alcohol abuse treatments

People looking for inpatient and outpatient alcohol treatment programs in the Bay Area can find the proper aid at Summit Estate Recovery Center. After admission, the residential alcoholism treatment program starts with a full evaluation. In this evaluation, doctors try to find any co-occurring disorders like anxiety or depression. In those cases, a dual diagnosis treatment is recommended.

After this evaluation, patients receive a medically supervised detoxification. The comfort and safety of Summit Estate Recovery Center’s facilities are very helpful on this matter. Afterwards, patient meet with the clinical staff to create an individualized plan that best suits them. They can also assist to additional, helpful activities like yoga, massage, acupuncture, among others. Inpatient programs might last up to 90 days.

Summit Estate Recovery Center also offers outpatient treatments to fit your schedule. This facility is located in Saratoga, California. In this place, patients can participate in discussion dinners specially coked by an onsite chef. Saratoga’s location also offers one-on-one, family and couples therapy sessions or groups.

Some patients that already went through the inpatient treatment are encouraged to follow outpatient treatment after their 30 or 60 days of therapy. In these cases, it’s necessary the authorization of Summit Estate Recovery Center’s medical staff and substance abuse counselors.

The help you need is a phone call away

Either if you or a beloved one is going through an alcohol addiction, you can receive the help you need at Summit Estate Recovery Center. Its luxurious facilities and expert staff provide the right environment and inpatient and outpatient alcohol treatment programs in the Bay Area. Call at 866-569-9391 to receive more information and talk more about what you’re going through.

The Physical Effects of Long-term Alcohol Abuse  

surgeons performing surgery The statistics on alcohol abuse in the United State are alarming. According to the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 15.1 million adults over the age of eighteen meet the criteria for an Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD). In addition, roughly 88,000 people die each year form alcohol related causes, and alcohol-impaired driving incidents cause close to 10,000 deaths per year. More troubling than these raw numbers is the fact that only about 1.8 million of individuals who meet the criteria for an AUD receive appropriate treatment at a specialized facility – less than ten percent. That’s not all. In 2010, Americans spent an estimated 249 billion dollars on health issues related to alcohol misuse. Worldwide, the toll of alcohol shows similarly scary numbers:

  • In 2012, alcohol consumption contributed to 3.3 million deaths.
  • In 2014, the World Health Organization reported that alcohol misuse caused over two-hundred diseases and adverse health conditions.
  • Alcohol misuse is characterized as the fifth leading risk factor for premature death and disability in the 15-49 year-old age group, while close to 25% of total deaths in the 20-39 year-old age group can be attributed to alcohol.

If you’re a drinker and you’re worried about your risk of developing an AUD, the first thing to do is determine your level of drinking. Heavy drinkers are at far greater risk of developing an AUD than low-to-moderate drinkers. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) defines heavy drinking as the consumption of five or more drinks on the same occasion on each of five or more days over the period of one month. In plain language, that means if you’ve had more than five drinks – probably meaning you got pretty drunk – more than five times in the past thirty days, you’re at high risk of developing a potentially life-threatening AUD.

Check Yourself, Check Your Health

Maybe you know you have a problem with drinking. Maybe you drink heavily every day, but still manage to keep it all together. You show up for work, you manage your family obligations, and your health hasn’t started to suffer – yet. Maybe you know some form of treatment for your alcohol use is in your future, but you’re not quite ready for treatment yet. You’re not ready to take the plunge into rehab, therapy, or even weekly support group meetings, because, despite your heavy drinking, everything seems to be going fine. The operative word in that last sentence is seems. In the case of chronic alcohol misuse – the kind that takes place over years – what you don’t know can, quite literally, kill you. That’s why it’s in your best interest to get checked out by a physician, even if you know you’re not going into treatment any time soon. If the statistics haven’t convinced you to at least consider a visit to the doctor, perhaps this next set of facts will.

The Effects of Alcohol on Your Major Organs

You probably know alcohol wreaks havoc on your liver, but that’s not the only organ that suffers under chronic alcohol use. Let’s take a look at the other organs negatively impacted by alcohol use, starting at the top. The Brain Alcohol can damage the function and structure of your brain. Recent technology in brain imaging shows significant decrease in brain tissue. Chronic over-consumption of alcohol can also lead to Wernicke’s-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS) a condition caused by vitamin B-1 deficiency. WKS is no picnic: effects may include alcoholic dementia, short-term memory loss, the inability to learn new information, cognitive impairment, eye problems, poor physical coordination, and difficulty walking. The Heart  Most people have read or heard that moderate alcohol consumption – say a glass or two of wine a day – is good for the cardiovascular system. What most people haven’t heard is that heavy alcohol consumption can damage your heart. Chronic, excessive drinking can to cardiomyopathy, which is a heart disease with symptoms like dizziness, fainting, shortness of breath, swelling of the lower extremities, fatigue, abnormal pulse, and cough accompanied by a frothy, pink discharge. Unfortunately, the symptoms of cardiomyopathy can stay hidden until it’s too late, and heart failure is imminent. The Liver Alcohol-related liver disease comes in three primary forms:

  1. Alcoholic Cirrhosis. Cirrhosis means scarring. Therefore, alcoholic cirrhosis, simply put, means severe scarring and liver damage, with symptoms similar to severe alcoholic hepatitis. You cannot reverse cirrhosis, but if you catch it early enough you can prevent further damage. Left untreated, cirrhosis causes permanent damage which can only be improved by a liver transplant. In 2013, over 30,000 people died from alcohol related liver disease, and close to one-third of liver transplants were alcohol related.
  2. Alcoholic Hepatitis. This condition causes an increase in fat, inflammation, and mild cirrhosis. People suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis often experience nausea, vomiting, poor appetite, stomach pain, fever, and jaundice. Statistics show that close to 35% of heavy drinkers develop alcoholic hepatitis. While mild cases can be reversed if you quit drinking, more extreme cases may develop quickly and can lead to severe complications, including death.
  3. Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. This condition is characterized by a buildup of fat in liver tissue, which impedes optimal function. Occasionally there are no symptoms at all. Of the three liver diseases caused by excessive alcohol consumption, alcoholic fatty liver disease is the least damaging, and can be reversed – but only if you quit drinking.

Alcohol and Cancer

Liver disease is the most common and well-known health risk associated with heavy drinking, but it’s not the only serious, chronic illness related to excessive alcohol use. The American Cancer Society (ACS) links the following forms of cancer to alcohol:

  • Mouth
  • Throat
  • Voice Box
  • Esophagus
  • Colon
  • Rectum
  • Breast

The message from the ACS is clear and simple: the more you drink, the higher your risk of getting cancer. Our message to you is also clear and simple: if you know you have an alcohol problem, but you’re not ready to enter treatment, you need to go to a doctor and get a full health examination. You may not be showing symptoms yet, but beneath the surface, things may be headed in a very bad direction. We understand not wanting to enter treatment for an Alcohol Use Disorder. Detox is hard, sobriety is harder, and recovery is a lifelong process. We understand you might not want to improve your psychological and emotional well-being, because right now, you’re functioning just fine. However, that body you’re living in is the only one you’ve got. We want to make sure you know, in no uncertain terms, that chronic, excess drinking can cause many conditions that are permanent, irreversible, and in some cases, fatal.

How Your Addiction Affects Your Children

child alone with teddy bear

There are countless reasons to seek treatment for a substance abuse or addiction disorder. First on the list is your personal health and well-being. If you aren’t aware of the consequences of addiction, you should know it affects all aspects of your life: physical, emotional, and spiritual. Physically speaking, the consequences of untreated addiction and substance abuse disorders are devastating. Long-term addiction ravages your central nervous system, your musculoskeletal system, your endocrine system, and all your major organs. Left untreated for long enough, a severe substance abuse disorder can lead to disability and death.

If those reasons aren’t enough to convince you to seek treatment for your substance abuse or addiction disorder, next on the list is the effect your addiction has on your loved ones. Your parents, siblings, and spouse or partner all suffer when addiction takes hold of your life. This article won’t address any those people, though. Instead, it will focus on the innocent and often forgotten victims of addiction: your children.

Warning: this article won’t pull any punches. Spoiler alert: exposing your child to addiction dramatically increases your child’s risk factors for many of the leading causes of death in adults. No, we’re not talking about actually giving your child drugs or alcohol – we assume most adults know better than to do something so reckless and harmful. What we’re talking about is this: children of parents struggling with addiction have a far greater chance of experiencing long-term physical, emotional, and social dysfunction than children of non-addicted parents.

Addiction, Parenting, and Adverse Childhood Experiences

Twenty years ago, the Centers for Disease Control launched a study on the effect of adverse childhood experiences on an individual’s long-term health. Known as the ACE Study, this paper launched the beginning of what’s now commonly referred to the mental health profession as trauma informed care. Over the past two decades, extensive research has verified that children exposed to adverse, traumatic experiences have an increased risk of the following life-threatening health conditions when they become adults:

  • Heart disease
  • Obesity
  • Alcohol Use Disorders
  • Substance Abuse Disorders

In addition, children exposed to adverse experiences are more likely to:

  • Develop learning disabilities
  • Display behavioral problems
  • Develop cognitive issues
  • Develop mood and/or anxiety disorders
  • Begin sexual activity early
  • Become pregnant during adolescence
  • Initiate domestic or intimate partner violence
  • Adopt risky behaviors

Now that you know what can happen as a result of adverse childhood experiences, it’s time to define what they are. The CDC Study identified all of the following as ACEs:

  • Physical, emotional, or sexual abuse
  • Physical or emotional neglect
  • Domestic violence
  • Living with an individual struggling with substance abuse or a mental health disorder
  • Living with an individual who was incarcerated
  • Experiencing racism and/or bullying
  • Living in foster homes
  • Living in an unsafe neighborhood
  • Witnessing violence

You may have noticed the fourth item on the list:

Living with an individual struggling with substance abuse or a mental health disorder.

If you’re a parent currently struggling with an untreated alcohol or substance abuse disorder and your children live with you, then it’s critical for you to understand that you might – emphasis on might – be exposing them to an adverse childhood experience. We warned you: we’re not pulling any punches. We’re talking about serious stuff, and the numbers don’t lie. However, none of this means you’re a bad person, a bad parent, or that your child is automatically going to grow up into a depressed, anxious, addicted adult struggling with obesity and heart problems. What it does mean is that your child does – according to the statistics – have a greater chance of developing one or all of those conditions, especially if there’s not another adult in the household to provide the necessary protective buffering needed to mitigate the effects of your addiction and related behaviors.

How ACEs Impact Children

The reason ACEs cause so much damage to children – and the mechanism by which this damage manifests as mental, emotional, and physical dysfunction in adulthood – is simple: stress. A reasonable amount of stress is healthy. Challenging and stressful experiences teach children to handle adversity and develop the positive coping mechanisms and problem-solving skills they need to become successful adults. The Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University defines three categories of stress in growing children:

  • Positive Stress is an essential part of typical, healthy development. Examples might be the first day of school or a difficult athletic event. Physical symptoms include increased heart rate and a slight elevation of stress hormone levels.
  • Tolerable Stress triggers a greater physical response. Heart rate and hormone levels increase dramatically. This level of stress might be caused by the death of a loved one, a natural disaster, or a serious injury. The negative physical and emotional effects of tolerable stress can be alleviated if the stressor does not last too long and the child has positive relationships with adults who can help the child adapt to and process the stressful situation.
  • Toxic Stress occurs when a child experiences extended periods of adversity, such as abuse, neglect, exposure to substance abuse, mental illness, or exposure to violence without positive adult support. When a child’s stress response system is activated for long periods of time, negative consequences include compromised brain and organ development, cognitive deficiencies, and increase risk for chronic disease.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), toxic stress is the primary reason adverse childhood experience have severe consequences. In a paper published in 2012, the AAP states that childhood stress crosses the threshold tolerable to toxic when children experience:

“…strong, frequent, or prolonged activation of the body’s stress response system in the absence of the buffering protection of a supportive adult.”

You just read the most important words in this article: “in the absence of the buffering protection of a supportive adult.” It’s possible for children to bounce back from exposure to your substance abuse or addiction disorder. It’s possible for them to live, grow, and thrive in the face of extreme adversity. It’s possible for them to succeed in life despite your addiction disorder. They can develop the coping skills and resiliency necessary to survive as long as the adverse experience – in this case, exposure to addiction – is balanced with positive, secure, protective experiences. But there’s a catch: they need a clear-headed, responsible, supportive adult to chaperone them through the tough times.

Be The Adult Your Child Needs

If you’re struggling with an untreated substance abuse or addiction disorder, it’s likely you’re not able to be that adult right now. We can’t give you parenting advice without meeting you, and we don’t know the details of your situation, but if you’re a parent struggling with an untreated substance abuse or addiction disorder and your children live with you, then for their sake, find a way to place them in a healthy, safe, and sustaining environment while you get help. When and if you embark on your journey to recovery, the life you save may not only be your own – it may also be the life of your child.

For Therapists: Does My Client Need Residential Treatment?

therapist and client

As a therapist, sometimes you have to make a tough call and recommend your clients for residential treatment for their addiction or substance abuse disorder. You may be hesitant to do so for a variety of reasons:

  • Residential treatment involves a total disruption of life-as-usual
  • You believe your client will resist the idea
  • You may need to stage an intervention
  • The cost may be prohibitive, even if you client is fully insured
  • Finding the right program in the right location may be difficult

There’s another big reason you may not want to recommend a residential program: you suspect your client may need one, but you’re not entirely convinced you’re correct. If you specialize in treating addiction and substance abuse disorders, you typically know by the end of a session or two if your client is a good candidate for residential treatment. You’re trained to see the signs and symptoms right away, and your recommendation is based on both training and experience.

If addiction isn’t your specialty, however, there are specific things to watch for if your client is suffering from a substance abuse disorder. The following list contains the primary indicators your client needs more than weekly therapy, support group meetings, or outpatient therapy:

  1. Habitual Relapse: If you’ve worked with your client through several failed attempts at sobriety, then you may need to consider the residential option.
  2. Failed Attempts at Outpatient Programs: If you client has been unsuccessful in Outpatient, Intensive Outpatient, or short-duration Inpatient or Partial Hospitalization programs, you may need to consider the residential option.
  3. Lack of Support: Your client may live or work in an environment that’s not conducive to sobriety, or they may have tapped out their available support systems. Often families and peers do everything they can to help a loved one trying to get and stay clean and sober, but their support is finite – and they’re also not trained professionals. If your client’s family has reached the end of both their energy and abilities, then you may need to consider the residential option.
  4. Dual Diagnosis: If you’re treating your client for a mood disorder or other emotional/psychiatric issue and you discover they’re been covering up a substance abuse problem, then a period of detox followed by residential treatment will help both of you get to the root of their behavioral disturbances. Sometimes it’s impossible – even for a trained and experienced therapist – to understand what’s really going on with a client, emotionally and psychologically speaking, when their symptoms overlap with those associated with substance abuse disorders.
  5. Safety: If your client’s behavior is rapidly escalating in a way that creates a safety risk for them or their immediate family, then a residential program may be necessary – sooner rather than later.

Finding the Right Program

In the 42nd edition of their “Treatment Improvement Protocol Series” published in 2005, The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) established the following nine criteria for evaluating the quality of residential substance abuse treatment programs:

  1. Screening and Assessment: Any potential program must have adequate pre-intake screening and assessment programs in place.
  2. Mental/Physical Health Exams: All examinations must be performed by fully qualified physicians and/or psychiatrists
  3. Onsite Prescribing Psychiatrist: Residential programs should have an on-site or on-call board-certified prescribing psychiatrist on staff in order to meet your client’s medication needs.
  4. Medication and Monitoring: Residential programs should staff either licensed nurses or physicians with the training to monitor and adjust medications as needed.
  5. Psychoeducational Classes: All residential programs should include solid addiction education and rehab prevention classes.
  6. Onsite Double-Trouble Groups: Each potential program should include support groups for individuals with dual diagnosis/co-occurring disorders.
  7. Offsite Support Groups: Residential programs should have direct connections to peer support groups such as A.A., N.A., SMART Recovery, or others.
  8. Family Education: A residential program should have formal systems in place which include your client’s family in the recovery process.
  9. Discharge planning: Quality residential programs create exit strategies – or re-entry plans – for all clients. These plans should include follow-up medical and psychiatric visits, support group resources, and emergency steps to take in case of relapse.

After Rehab: How You Can Help

The work of easing your client through the step-down process from residential treatment back to day-to-day life starts before they enter the program. The first step for you, as their therapist, is to find out which individual, within the administrative hierarchy of the treatment center, should be your primary contact. Reach out to them by phone or email and have a frank and honest conversation about your client’s history and immediate needs. Make yourself available as a resource while your client is in treatment and stay abreast of which treatment modalities are working and which aren’t. This knowledge will be crucial for your client’s continued sobriety upon discharge. If possible, collaborate with the treatment center staff to design a realistic and sustainable post-residential sobriety plan. Be ready to support your client when they begin the step-down process.

There will be challenges, of course, but if your client feels supported by everyone involved, their chances of avoiding relapse increase dramatically. The most successful recovery is one in which everyone involved – client, families, and therapists – have all the information they need to make good decisions before, during, and after residential treatment.

Call us at 800-701-6997 to learn how we can help your client.

College Students Ask: Is My Drinking Really a Problem? Do I Need Addiction Treatment for Alcohol?

college students sitting on bench

Summertime means different things for different college students. Some travel abroad, some take classes to catch up or get ahead, some stay busy with internships or jobs, and some take a well-deserved break from the school grind to chill, relax, and recharge their internal batteries. It’s a natural time to look back on the year, decide how it went, and make plans for the upcoming semester.

If your year went well, then you’re probably loving summer, but you’re also looking forward to getting back on campus. If your year wasn’t great, then maybe you have a little more on your mind. Maybe your grades weren’t what you wanted. Maybe you partied more than you should have. Maybe you drank a little too much.

Maybe you think your drinking affected your grades.

Maybe it’s more than that: you know you went way overboard with the partying and drinking and you’re sure that’s why your grades weren’t up to par. Then you kept up the partying through the summer, and now you think you may have a problem. Worse, you know when you go back to school – where the excessive drinking started – it’s going to be really hard to keep yourself in check.

Now you’re worried: what should you do?

Do you see a professional? Go to support group meetings? Get addiction treatment? Do you do all that before you go back to school, so you set yourself up for success?

Those are all valid questions. If you’re asking them of yourself, you should take them seriously. The first thing you need to do is figure out if your drinking really is a problem. In the language of treatment and recovery, it’s time for you to decide – and be brutally honest with yourself – if your drinking is within typical limits, or if you have what’s called an Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD).

What is an Alcohol Use Disorder?

The handbook used by mental health professionals to diagnose and classify mental health and substance abuse disorders is called the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-V). If you think you have a problem with alcohol, then you can use the following questionnaire – as recommended by the DSM-V – to diagnose yourself.

In the past year, have you…

  1. Had times when you ended up drinking more, or longer, than you intended?
  2. More than once wanted to cut down or stop drinking, or tried to, but couldn’t?
  3. Spent a lot of time drinking, or being sick and getting over the after-effects of drinking?
  4. Wanted a drink so badly you couldn’t think of anything else?
  5. Found that drinking, or being sick from drinking, often interfered with taking care of your home or family, cause job-related troubles, or problems with school?
  6. Continued to drink even though it was causing trouble with your family or friends?
  7. Given up or cut back on activities that were important or interesting to you, or gave you pleasure, in order to drink?
  8. More than once gotten into situations while or after drinking that increased your chances of getting hurt?
  9. Continued to drink even after a memory blackout, and even though it was making you feel depressed or anxious or adding to another health problem?
  10. Had to drink much more than you once did to get the effect you want, or found that your usual number of drinks had much less effect than before?
  11. Found that when the effects of alcohol were wearing off, you had withdrawal symptoms such as trouble sleeping, shakiness, restlessness, nausea, sweating, a racing heart, sensing things that were not there, or seizures?

If you answer yes to two or more of the questions above, then the DSM-V indicates you have an AUD. AUDs can be mild, moderate, or sever:

  • Mild: positive answers to two or three of the diagnostic questions.
  • Moderate: positive answers to four or five of the diagnostic questions.
  • Severe: positive answers to six or more of the diagnostic questions.

Common Levels of Alcohol Use

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) offer simple definitions of alcohol consumption and how these levels affect general health and wellness. If you’re unsure where you fall on the continuum, use these guidelines to clarify your position:

  • Moderate Alcohol Consumption: Up to one drink a day for women and two drinks a day for men.
  • Binge Drinking: Five or more drinks for men and four or more drinks for women in a two-hour period on at least one day over the course of a month.
  • Heavy Alcohol Consumption: Binge drinking on five or more days over the course of a month.

These definitions align with what most people know through personal experience. Moderate consumption is what everyone would consider normal, social drinking. Binge drinking tends to happen in college or early adulthood. Heavy drinking is what happens when consumption gets out of hand and becomes an obvious problem.

However, these three categories beg the question: “What constitutes one drink?” Serving sizes and alcohol content can vary a great deal. Drinking at a bar or restaurant is not the same as drinking at a private party, and the amount of alcohol in a drink depends on what you’re drinking: beer, malt liquor, wine, and distilled spirits all contain different percentages of alcohol. Here’s how the NIAAA defines a standard drink:

  • 12 ounces of beer containing around 5% alcohol. Think of a regular can of beer.
  • 8-9 ounces of malt liquor containing around 7% alcohol. Think of a pint glass around half-full.
  • 5 ounces of wine containing around 12% alcohol. Think of a regular glass of wine you might get with dinner at a restaurant.
  • 5 ounces of distilled spirits (liquor like vodka, whiskey, gin, or tequila) containing around 40% alcohol (80 proof). Think of a regular-sized shot glass.

Are You at Risk of Developing an Alcohol Use Disorder?

Based on the figures above, the NIAA defines low-risk drinking as:

  • Less than three drinks a day and seven drinks a week for women.
  • Less than four drinks a day and fourteen drinks a week for men.

Only around 2% of people who drink within these limits – i.e. low-to-moderate drinkers – develop an AUD. Consumption above these levels increases the chance of developing an AUD. The NIAA College Fact Sheet reveals that the drinking habits of college students make them particularly vulnerable to developing an AUD. The facts speak for themselves:

  • Close to 67% of college students who reported drinking at least once a month also engage in binge drinking
  • Binge drinkers who consume alcohol at least three times a week are six times more likely to perform poorly on a test due to drinking, and five times more likely to miss a class due to drinking
  • Roughly 25% of college students report alcohol negatively impacts their academic performance
  • About 20% of college students meet the DSM-V established criteria for an AUD.

Now, re-read the NIAA definition of low-risk drinking. If your drinking habits exceed those parameters and put you in the at-risk category, then it’s time to face the facts: you may well be on your way to an Alcohol Use Disorder. And if you know you have a problem, then it’s time to consider treatment options. It’s not time to freak out, but it is time to do something about it.

Back to that initial question: should you do something about it before you go back, to set yourself up for success?

The answer is simple: yes.

Take the time you have now to lay down the foundation for a successful year. Call us at 800-701-6997 and we’ll do everything we can to help you get control of your drinking and get your life on track. Also, keep an eye on this blog: upcoming posts will discuss the Sober Dorm movement happening on college campuses across the country, and provide an extensive list of helpful resources designed specifically for college students struggling to make it through school while in recovery from alcohol and substance abuse.

 

Drug Overdose Kills More Americans Than Car Accidents

Drug and opioid addiction recovery at Summit Estate Recovery CenterMore than 40,000 Americans die each year from drug overdoses and more than half of those overdose deaths involve opioids. Drug overdoses account for more deaths in the US than car accidents or gun violence. In the most recent data available, 52,404 Americans died of drug overdoses in 2015 as compared to 35,092 people died (according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) from motor vehicle accidents in the U.S. in the same period.

With all these deaths, what are opioids specifically and how to they work?

Opioids are compounds that bind to receptors in a person’s brain, which blocks pain and slows breathing. Opioid causes the brain to release the natural chemical dopamine and people typically feel a calm “happy” high. Addiction causes people to take opioids regularly, and as a result, they develop a tolerance to the drugs. This forces people to take more and more of the drugs to achieve the same effect. Therefore, if enough of the drug is taken it causes a person to stop breathing altogether, making overdoses often fatal. Some opioids – heroin – are illegal. While others, hydrocodone or oxycodone are prescribed for pain relief – the two most common brand names are Vicodin and OxyContin. Prescriptions for the drugs have skyrocketed over the years, from 76 million in 1991 to over 260 million last year. To compound the issue the influx of fentanyl, a painkiller prescribed for acute pain that is up to 50 times more powerful than heroin, is leading to higher rates of overdose nationwide. Opioid usage is high across the United States with many of the states hit hardest by the epidemic — West Virginia, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and Ohio. The epidemic affects both rural and urban areas equally.

Where Does Someone Get Their Drugs from?

Most often is it is believed that overprescribing is fueling the epidemic. A person gets injured and is prescribed painkillers, which quietly leads to addiction. However, according to federal data, most people start out by taking the painkillers of a friend or family member and become addicted quickly. Experimentation typically starts during adolescence or young adulthood, but opioid addiction affects people of all ages equally and leads to devastating consequences. Those attempting to recovery by practicing abstinence alone when it comes to opioid addiction fail at a high rate, with roughly 90 percent of people relapsing. That is why at Summit Estate, we understand that every addiction is unique. We are committed to helping our clients have a brighter future free from addiction. So, we have developed a personalized addiction treatment program to address our clients’ specific needs. Our exclusive rehab centers offer truly personalized care for total healing from poly-substance addiction and co-occuring disorders like depression and anxiety. The luxurious facilities and beautiful grounds provide all of the important amenities individuals need to feel comfortable while undergoing drug and alcohol detox. Our innovative recovery programs are offered by highly credentialed treatment professionals who aim to provide each client with the highest level of care possible. With a small client population, each individual receives the one-on-one attention needed to overcome addiction and go on to live a happy, balanced life.

Gene’s Story

gene“I grew up in a household filled with alcoholism and co-dependency,” says Gene. When he was 13 years old his parents divorced and he moved to Northern California from Southern California. He began using alcohol and drugs in his early teens. “I was introduced to marijuana at 13 years old and from that point I did all type of drugs,” says Gene.  For the next decade he was abusing alcohol and drugs regularly. In an attempt to quit, he entered military service in his early 20s. But, that proved ineffective as the urge to use drugs was more powerful than military life. “I was asked to leave because of cocaine use,” says Gene. In the mid-1980s, Gene’s family and friends staged an intervention and he went into a treatment program.  “I was able to stay sober for 13 years and I got my life back on track,” says Gene.  But, Gene relapsed “while sober I didn’t take care of the underlying issues that caused my addiction and expand my spiritual life,” he says. During an especially difficult life changes – divorce and job layoff – Gene slipped into taking prescription pain pills and illegal narcotics. For the next decade Gene went through the darkest moments of his life. “I dealt with alcohol blackouts, started using cocaine again, and overdosed,” says Gene.  “I was tired of living this way.” A few friends of Gene found Summit Estate.  In summer of 2015, they encourage him to give it a try. “Summit Estate’s approach to recovery was different – a holistic view of overall health,” says Gene. Summit Estate introduced him to healthy ways to deal with his addiction and how to live differently – without drugs and alcohol. “Summit Estate thought me how to just sit with myself, how to breathe when confronted with difficult situation, how to mediate, and I even started practicing yoga – simple steps that helped a lot,” says Gene. “Summit Estate introduced me to a holistic approach to recovery – it felt like recovery 2.0 – they taught me to take care all the aspects of life to gain true recovery,” says Gene. Gene is continuing with his recovery and he is also helping others who are on their own journey of recovery. “At Summit Estate I learned to identify those triggers that would cause a relapse and how to deal with them without jeopardizing my recovery,” he says. Now 55 years old, “I am in a good place spiritually, mentally, emotionally, and physically,” says Gene. His sense of humor also continues to be a source of strength by living life on life’s terms. “I am in the 3rd quarter of my life and looking forward to overtime,” jokes Gene.