Category Archives: Detox

CA, NY, and Safe Injection Sites

Substance Abuse and Treatment

There is a lot that’s controversial about substance abuse and treatment, such as various issues related to marijuana and whether medication-assisted treatment is the best way to go. For example, one of the more polarizing questions is whether or not people suffering from opioid addiction should be offered safe injection sites, where they would find clean needles and be supervised. These sites are not a new idea; CNN reports that in addition to Canada, Australia and some European countries already have them. In 2017, a California bill proposing safe injection sites in eight counties and certain cities such as Los Angeles failed to pass the state Senate. Had it passed, the state would have been the first in the nation to have them. San Francisco was hoping to start one modeled after the one in Vancouver. One senator said they’d be “shooting galleries for street heroin,” yet another implied they centers would be a heck of a lot better in helping people “get off drugs and lead healthy, successful lives” than what’s happening now.

 Supervised Consumption Facilities 

Yet this year it looks as if cities are taking matters into their own hands, according to the CNN article. In February, The San Francisco Department of Public Health “unanimously endorsed a task force’s recommendation” to open a center. About 22,000 people have overdosed in the city, and in 2017, 100 people died of an overdose there. The mayor said that the sites aren’t ideal, but they’re a necessity with the current opioid epidemic. Two are scheduled to open in San Francisco in July. For people wanting statistics on the likelihood of these centers’ “success,” the article has this: “More than 100 peer-reviewed studies on safe injection sites — otherwise known as supervised consumption facilities — have consistently shown them to be effective at reducing overdose deaths, preventing transmission of HIV and viral hepatitis, reducing street-based drug use and linking people to drug treatment and other services.They can also save cities money, which is not to say they’re a good solution to an overwhelming problem.

 top rehab center in California

Injection Sites 

The video accompanying the CNN article showed an overdose victim being revived with Narcan. It was rewarding to see her “come to,” but on the other hand, it was quite upsetting to see her so out of it initially. The video also explained (and showed) what happens to your body during an overdose, which makes a viewer wish that those hooked on opioids would watch it and consider rehab. New York is having its own its own problems trying to get injection sites, as this headline indicates: De Blasio’s Plan for Safe Drug Injection Sites Faces Substantial Hurdles. The mayor would like four initially, but according to the articles, the federal government may determine that the plan “violate(s) the nation’s drug laws.” A spokesperson pointed to what happened in Vermont, where the U.S. Attorney for the state cautioned officials who want the centers about legal repercussions  (see below).

Rehab Centers in California 

Besides New York, other cities such as Seattle and Baltimore, are moving toward opening sites. Philadelphia has publicly announced that they’d like private companies to set up shop in their city. The Vermont federal prosecutor decreed that using illicit narcotics and managing and maintaining sites on which drugs are used and distributed, is illegal, and would expose workers and drug users to criminal charges. Not only that, but the properties where the centers were located could also be forfeited. De Blasio practically pleaded for the centers, saying they would save lives (and prevent up to 130 overdoses a year). (Last year, the city had over 1,400 overdose deaths.) Around the same time as he appeared on TV, a woman reported that she got clean with the help of a safe injection site but didn’t go into detail. It’s difficult to fully understand the politics, or the weight different government bodies hold in the dispute. How could California try to pass a bill in favor of the sites, when the federal government would likely swoop in as it did in Vermont? And how are cities inviting the centers in when they likely would be stomping on federal law, too? You wonder, as the opioid epidemic rages on, what will happen. For more information contact our top rehab center in California at  (866) 569-9391.

Getting and Staying Sober in College

sober living dorms

The Rise of Collegiate Recovery Programs

There is no easy time in life to start your recovery journey. When you’re struggling with any sort of Substance Abuse Disorder (SUD), whether the substance is alcohol, illegal drugs, or prescription medication, you have a tough, life-changing, and possibly life-saving decision to make. Once the decision is made and you commit to taking positive action to address your SUD, you realize getting sober is only the first step on a long road. You quickly understand that in the grand scheme of things, the detoxification period – a.k.a. quitting your substance of choice and surviving withdrawal – is relatively short, whereas recovery is forever. There’s no real debate about this. If you don’t come to this conclusion on your own, it’s one of the first things you hear from addiction counselors, therapists, and people in support groups: recovery is a lifelong process.

Any new beginning is delicate, and can set the tone for whatever phase of life you’re entering. That’s why getting and staying sober is especially challenging if you’re a college student. The deck is stacked against you both socially and culturally. The college years are widely accepted as the period of life when you can experiment with alcohol and drugs without experiencing major consequences. It’s almost expected that a typical college student, living away from home for the first time, with easy access to alcohol and drugs – possibly for the first time – will dabble with drinking and smoking marijuana. College students who get caught drinking under age or with small amounts of marijuana are often let off with little more than a slap on the wrist, often delivered with a knowing smile, a friendly wink, and an understanding nod. Even extreme behavior, such as binge drinking and forays into harder drugs like cocaine, methamphetamine, and hallucinogens, tends to be overlooked or readily forgiven.

For many, this de facto acceptance does not present much of a problem. You go to college, you get a little wild, then something happens to pull you back to earth. You have some sort of near-miss – maybe a scrape with the law, maybe an automobile accident, or maybe a sub-par academic semester – and you see it as a wake-up call. You get your act together, cut back on the risky behavior, and get on with your life.

For others – meaning anyone prone to substance addiction and abuse – the permissive status quo is a recipe for disaster, particularly where alcohol is concerned. The NIAA College Fact Sheet reveals that the drinking habits of college students make them particularly vulnerable to developing an Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD). The facts speak for themselves:

  • Close to 67% of college students who reported drinking at least once a month also engage in binge drinking
  • Binge drinkers who consume alcohol at least three times a week are six times more likely to perform poorly on a test due to drinking, and five times more likely to miss a class due to drinking
  • Roughly 25% of college students report alcohol negatively impacts their academic performance
  • About 20% of college students meet the established criteria for an AUD.

In an environment where the majority of your peers drink regularly and the overwhelming preponderance of social activities revolve around alcohol, getting sober is tough- but staying sober is even tougher. The prospect is so daunting you might feel like you’re in a no-win situation, and you think your only options are to drop out or suffer through four years of self-destructive behavior. If we’ve just described you, then don’t despair. There’s real help out there for you. It’s closer than you think, and it’s gaining momentum with each passing semester: The Collegiate Recovery Movement.

Collegiate Recovery Programs and Collegiate Recovery Communities

What began as a small program at Brown University forty years ago is now a bona fide, evidence-based, time-tested approach to achieving and maintaining sobriety for college students. Today, over 150 institutes of higher learning across the country provide alcohol and substance abuse recovery services for students. These programs revolve around four core elements:

  1. Academic Support. Tutors and guidance counselors assist with the transition from treatment programs back to the rigors of daily class work and studying.
  2. Recovery Support. Collegiate programs help connect students with on-campus support groups such as AA, NA, or SMART Recovery, when available, or local support groups if none exist on campus.
  3. Crisis Management. Many programs connect students with mental and behavioral health support through on-campus clinics or hospitals. The presence of qualified health professionals is particularly helpful for students with co-occurring disorders, those who overdose, or those who haven’t yet entered recovery seeking information or advice on the best steps to take.
  4. Relapse Prevention. Successful collegiate recovery programs provide resources for sober social activities, offer workshops on how to manage peer pressure, and advice on navigating tricky social situations.

These four components are critical in helping college students get and stay sober, but there’s another piece of the puzzle that can make all the difference: your living environment. If you’re doing everything right, recovery-wise, i.e. abstaining from alcohol or drugs, going to support group meetings, seeing a therapist or counselor, and avoiding alcohol-centric social functions, your recovery may be more difficult if you live in a college dorm. When you’re surrounded by peers actively engaged in the party-hangover-class-party-hangover-class cycle, you probably feel like you’re swimming upstream, because you are.

Thankfully, there’s an additional option to explore: recovery housing.

Sober Dorms: The Missing Link in Collegiate Recovery

A study on social support for recovering alcoholics published in 2009 reveals a key data point:

“Those who added at least one non-drinking member to their social network showed twenty-seven percent increase at twelve months post-treatment in the likelihood of treatment success, and sustaining abstinence.”

This insight is critical: it proves that a sober social network can drastically increase your chances of maintaining sobriety. If adding just one non-drinking member to your social circle can increase your chances of staying sober by twenty-seven percent, then imagine what it would be like to live in a dorm surrounded by dozens of sober peers.

It could be a game-changer.

The best example of a sober dorm is the Recovery House at Rutgers University, located on their main campus in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Established in 1988, Recovery House was the first recovery residence hall in the country, and it’s set the standard for sober dorms ever since.

Here’s how it works:

  • Students must be sober for at least 90 days to be eligible
  • Students must attend at least two support group meetings per week
  • Students must attend a monthly house meeting
  • Students have access to a dedicated substance abuse counselor employed by the university
  • Students have access to 140 sober social activities over the course of the school year, organized by the house staff

And it does work. The statistics on residents of Recovery House are compelling:

  • The average GPA is a solid 3.23
  • Students living in the house for more than one semester have an average GPA of 3.4
  • Students living in the house for more than ten semesters have an average abstinence rate of 95%
  • Each semester, 98% of house residents either return or graduate – 13% higher than the university average
  • Over its thirty years, roughly 600 students have passed through the house

College Students: Find Your Community, Find Your Recovery Peers, Find Your House 

If you’re a college student working a sobriety program but feel your recovery is in jeopardy because you’re surrounded by non-stop alcohol, drugs, and partying, please don’t give up. You may be right: your recovery may be threatened by your current environment, and your best option may be to look for a different place to finish school. As mentioned above, over 150 colleges and universities across the country offer recovery services for students, and of those, 50 offer sober residence facilities. You might not find your recovery community right away, and it might be necessary to take a semester off while you get everything in place. While it might be hard to leave your school and your friends, consider this: making the move sooner rather than later might just prevent you from relapse. Which, if you’ve been listening to your counselors and recovery partners, might just save your life – not to mention graduate with that degree you’ve worked so hard to earn.

The Dangers of Alcohol Self-Detox: Is It Safe to Detox on Your Own?

man in bed detoxing

When to Stop Drinking 

The question of whether to quit drinking alcohol or not is a serious one. Fortunately, there’s a rule of thumb to follow if you think you need to take a break from alcohol or stop drinking altogether. It’s simple. If you’ve ever asked yourself either of these two questions: “Should I lay off alcohol for a while?” or “Should I quit drinking?” The answer is yes. That’s not direct medical advice; only your doctor can give you that. Nor is it a suggestion to stop drinking cold turkey right now without consulting a medical professional or addiction specialist; that’s dangerous and can have serious repercussions. Yes is the universally appropriate answer to these questions for two common-sense reasons. First, if you don’t have an alcohol problem – called an Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) by mental health and substance abuse experts – and your alcohol consumption is low-to-moderate with a minor risk of developing an AUD, then a period without alcohol will do absolutely no harm. You’ll get a first-hand reminder of how much social activity in our culture revolves around alcohol and alcohol-related activities. Second, if you do have an AUD, a yes answer to these questions can be the impetus you need to get sober and live a life without the pain and suffering associated with substance abuse. This article addresses questions which necessarily follow the yes answers. It defines and discusses the different types of alcohol use, the risk factors for developing an AUD, the health complications caused by excessive drinking, and the dangers of attempting to detox from alcohol without professional guidance and monitoring.

What is an Alcohol Use Disorder?

The fifth edition of the American Psychological Association’s authoritative publication, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-V), is the gold-standard reference handbook used by mental health professionals to diagnose and classify mental health and substance abuse disorders. The DSM-V identifies the presence of an AUD by posing the following eleven questions to a patient: In the past year, have you…

  1. Had times when you ended up drinking more, or longer, than you intended?
  2. More than once wanted to cut down or stop drinking, or tried to, but couldn’t?
  3. Spent a lot of time drinking, or being sick and getting over the after-effects of drinking?
  4. Wanted a drink so badly you couldn’t think of anything else?
  5. Found that drinking, or being sick from drinking, often interfered with taking care of your home or family, cause job-related troubles, or problems with school?
  6. Continued to drink even though it was causing trouble with your family or friends?
  7. Given up or cut back on activities that were important or interesting to you, or gave you pleasure, in order to drink?
  8. More than once gotten into situations while or after drinking that increased your chances of getting hurt?
  9. Continued to drink even after a memory blackout, and even though it was making you feel depressed or anxious or adding to another health problem?
  10. Had to drink much more than you once did to get the effect you want, or found that your usual number of drinks had much less effect than before?
  11. Found that when the effects of alcohol were wearing off, you had withdrawal symptoms such as trouble sleeping, shakiness, restlessness, nausea, sweating, a racing heart, sensing things that were not there, or seizures?

Positive answers (yes) to two or more of these questions indicates the presence of an AUD. The DSM-V further clarifies the scope of the AUD by identifying three categories, or levels of severity:

  • Mild: positive answers to two or three of the diagnostic questions.
  • Moderate: positive answers to four or five of the diagnostic questions.
  • Severe: positive answers to six or more of the diagnostic questions.

The DSM-V, published in 2013, alters the diagnostic criteria from those presented in the DSM-IV, published in 1994 and revised in 2000. The DSM-V eliminates two distinct diagnoses – alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence – and replaces them with the single diagnosis, Alcohol Use Disorder, which is then divided into mild, moderate, and severe sub-classifications. 

Common Levels of Alcohol Use

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) offer easy-to-understand definitions of alcohol consumption and how different levels of consumption affect general health and wellness. If you’re unsure where you fall on the continuum, use these guidelines to help understand your level of use:

  • Moderate Alcohol Consumption is defined as drinking up to one drink a day for women and two drinks a day for men.
  • Binge Drinking is defined as drinking five or more drinks for men and four or more drinks for women in a two-hour period on at least one day over the course of one month.
  • Heavy Alcohol Consumption is defined as binge drinking on five or more days over the course of one month.

These definitions are straightforward and align with what most people know through direct personal experience or typical social contact. Moderate consumption is synonymous with the default notion of responsible, social drinking; binge drinking largely occurs during college years or early adulthood; heavy drinking is what happens when consumption gets out of hand and becomes a relatively obvious problem. Clear as these delineations may be, they beg another question: “What constitutes one drink?” This is important to understand, because serving sizes and alcohol content vary depending on a variety of factors. Drinking at a bar or restaurant is not the same as drinking at a private party, and the amount of alcohol in a drink depends on the drink in question: beer, malt liquor, wine, and distilled spirits all contain different percentages of alcohol. Here’s how the NIAAA defines a standard drink:

  • 12 ounces of beer containing around 5% alcohol. Think of a regular can of beer.
  • 8-9 ounces of malt liquor containing around 7% alcohol. Think of a pint glass around half-full.
  • 5 ounces of wine containing around 12% alcohol. Think of a regular glass of wine you might get with dinner at a restaurant.
  • 5 ounces of distilled spirits (liquor like vodka, whiskey, gin, or tequila) containing around 40% alcohol (80 proof). Think of a regular-sized shot glass.

Are You at Risk of Developing an Alcohol Use Disorder?

Based on the figures above, the NIAA defines low-risk drinking as:

  • Less than three drinks a day and seven drinks a week for women.
  • Less than four drinks a day and fourteen drinks a week for men.

NIAA research shows that only around two percent of people who drink within these limits – i.e. low-to-moderate drinkers – develop an AUD. Consumption above these levels increases the chance of developing an AUD. The 2015 SAMHSA Survey on Drug Use and Health estimates that 15.1 million adults and 623,000 adolescents have crossed the threshold and developed alcohol use disorders. The same survey reveals another disturbing fact: of those 15.1 million adults and 623,000 adolescents, less than 10% receive professional treatment in a specialized substance abuse facility. If you fall into the at-risk category, it may be time to consider treatment options – but before you follow through on the decision to quit drinking and seek help, it’s important to understand both the health risks of drinking and the dangers of detoxing without the assistance of a qualified substance abuse professional.

Health Risks of Alcohol Abuse: The Big Picture

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) report that alcohol is the fourth leading cause of preventable death in the United States, accounting for around 88,000 fatalities per year. A study published by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine estimates the economic burden of excessive alcohol use at $249 billion for the year 2010. Data from The World Health Organization indicates that alcohol consumption contributes to around 3.3 million deaths per year – roughly 6% of all global fatalities.

Alcohol and The Human Body

Ongoing patterns of excessive alcohol consumption have significant negative health consequences. Heavy consumption over a long period of time can damage the brain, the heart, the liver, and the pancreas. This NIAAA list details the effect of alcohol on each organ: Brain: Heavy alcohol consumption disrupts key chemical communication pathways – called neurotransmitter systems – such as GABA, glutamate, serotonin, and dopamine. This disruption can affect cognitive function, mood, behavior, hormone regulation, and movement. Heart: Heavy alcohol consumption can contribute to problems that lead to hypertension, stroke, arrhythmia, and cardiomyopathy. Liver: Heavy alcohol consumption leads to pathologies such as cirrhosis, fibrosis, alcoholic hepatitis, and steatosis. Pancreas: Heavy alcohol consumption results in the production of toxic chemicals that can lead to pancreatitis. Long-term heavy alcohol consumption also compromises the immune system, making it easier to succumb to diseases like tuberculosis and pneumonia, and elevates the risk of developing cancers of the mouth, esophagus, throat, liver, and breast.

Acute Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome (AW) 

The human body is an incredibly adaptive and resilient group of complex and complementary physiological systems. One characteristic of the body is its ability to achieve homeostasis – a.k.a. balance – in the face of extreme stress, the presence of harmful toxins, and despite the self-destructive behaviors common to humans, some of which persist for decades before damage disrupts day-to-day living. With regards to long-term exposure to alcohol due to chronic heavy drinking, the body adjusts over time and finds a way to keep functioning. When alcohol is abruptly removed from the system, however, the body does not have time to adapt, and things can turn very bad very quickly. In 1998, a group of physicians on the faculty of Yale University published the article “Complications of Alcohol Withdrawal”  which describes the dangers of acute alcohol withdrawal in no uncertain terms: “Disease process or events that accompany acute alcohol withdrawal (AW) can cause significant illness and death. Some patients experience seizures, which may increase in severity with subsequent AW episodes. Another potential AW complication is delirium tremens, characterized by hallucinations, mental confusion, and disorientation. Cognitive impairment and delirium may lead to chronic memory disorder (i.e. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome). Psychiatric problems associated with withdrawal include anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. In addition, alterations in physiology, mood, and behavior may persist after acute withdrawal has subsided, motivating relapse to heavy drinking.”  In plain language, this means alcohol detox can kill, cause brain damage, and lead to extreme psychiatric disorders. Further, the likelihood of these negative effects increases with each withdrawal episode and may lead to relapse. The onset AW symptoms can occur as quickly as six hours after the cessation of alcohol consumption. For some, mild tremors, anxiety, nausea, and insomnia form the totality of AW and can resolve untreated after several days. In approximately 10% of cases, severe AW includes seizures, delirium tremens (DTs), Wernicke’s Encephalopathy (WE), Wernicke’s-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS), and “disturbances of thought, mood, and perception.” Among patients who experience DTs, the mortality rate is 5-25%. Among those who develop WE/WKS, approximately 80% experience permanent brain damage resulting in chronic amnesia and the inability to learn new information.

Medically Assisted Alcohol Detox

This article began by claiming that the question of whether to quit drinking alcohol or not is a serious one. The potential complications associated with alcohol withdrawal discussed above underscore the gravity of the question and all it implies. Most people, even those in recovery, don’t know that alcohol detox is more dangerous and has more severe complications than detox from almost all other drugs of abuse, including opiates, narcotics, benzodiazepines, and amphetamines. Detox from heroin, for example, can be extremely uncomfortable, but it won’t kill you, whereas detox from alcohol most certainly can. It doesn’t have to, though. It’s possible to avoid the life-threatening complications of alcohol detox by consulting a medical professional with specific experience in addiction and medically-assisted detox protocols. A qualified physician can formulate a safe detox plan and prescribe medications to prevent seizures, DTs, and alleviate the psychological and psychiatric side-effects of withdrawal. Medically assisted detox can also successfully treat Wernicke’s Encephalopathy and prevent the onset of Wernicke’s-Korsakoff Syndrome.

Alcohol Detox at Summit Estate

You can detox from alcohol without suffering permanent brain damage or killing yourself – but you should not try it alone. Summit Estate offers custom-designed, individual detox programs managed by highly skilled substance abuse and addiction experts. State-of-the-art luxury facilities, peaceful surroundings, and healthy, delicious food keep you as comfortable as possible while on-site staff monitor your vital signs and self-reported symptoms to mitigate health risks, ensure the efficacy of the detox protocol, and create a solid foundation for sustainable, life-long recovery.

Will My Loved One Be Comfortable During Detox?

One of the first questions that loved ones ask when deciding on a treatment center is if their family member will be kept comfortable during detox. Even if you don’t know a lot about the detoxification process, you’ve probably heard a thing or two about how uncomfortable it can be. Each drug has different withdrawal symptoms associated with it, but these symptoms can be debilitating. The most common withdrawal symptoms include anxiety, sweating, shaking, irritability, vomiting and diarrhea. Choosing the right detox program ensures that these symptoms will be managed.

What Can You Expect From Our Detox Program?

Will My Loved One Be Comfortable During DetoxAt Summit Estate, we make the comfort of our clients a top priority. We know that if we can get our clients through the detoxification process as successfully as possible, they will be better prepared for the recovery process. Our goal is to control their withdrawal symptoms using the right balance of medicine. Upon the first few hours of arrival, your loved one will meet with our physicians and have a customized detox plan created specifically for their needs and goals. Our physicians will take into account the mental and physical health of your loved one as well as their substance abuse history. Your loved one will be monitored for their comfort and safety, and we can adjust their medication as needed.

What Makes Our Detox Program Unique?

Our program follows suit with other pain medication detox programs in that it allows all clients to detoxify in a comfortable and controlled manner. In other words, your loved one will be given the right balance of medications to eliminate the pain and discomfort that is commonly associated with the detox and withdrawal process. This way, they will be able to focus their mental and physical energy where it belongs: on their recovery.

Premier Features Of Our Program

In addition to keeping withdrawal symptoms controlled, our pain medication detox program also provides the following features:

  • High staff to client ratio
  • Luxury amenities
  • Comfortable, retreat-style environment
  • Attention to exercise, nutrition and mental health
  • Individualized treatment plans
  • Monitoring of vital signs
  • Delicious gourmet meals
  • Optional 12-step and alternative group meetings

The Start To A Long-term Recovery Plan For Your Loved One

We know how scary it can be to make detox an ultimatum for your loved one, but rest assured that you are doing the right thing. The sooner you can get your loved one through detoxification, the sooner they can start working on their long-term recovery plan and begin a life that is free from the hold of drugs and alcohol. Summit Estate Recovery Center has a pain medication detox program that can be customized to your loved one’s needs. Call us today to learn more about how we can start your loved one on this liberating path to a clean, sober life. Learn More About Our Detox Program In The Santa Cruz And San Jose Area

5 FAQs About Detox That You Need To Know

Destination-5 FAQs About Detox-Medical Detox In Northern CA

One of the most talked about but least understood aspects of overcoming drug or alcohol addiction is detox. The mystery surrounding the process often stems from the fact that everyone’s experience with it is different.

FAQs About Detox

To help minimize the unknowns, we’ve listed five of the most common questions we get asked about detox and have provided answers. If you’ve had questions about the process, we encourage you to keep reading!

1. What Exactly Is Detox?

Prior to entering a recovery program, you will need to rid your body of all intoxicating substances. If you’ve been abusing drugs and/or alcohol for an extended period of time, your body has built up a tolerance. The elimination process of these substances from your body is called detoxification or detox for short. This is the first step in breaking the dangerous cycle of addiction and establishes the foundation for starting on the journey of recovery.

2. How Do I Know If I Need Detox?

Anyone who is considering treatment for drug or alcohol addiction should be evaluated to determine whether or not detox is needed. Although you’ve probably been in denial for some time about your problem, this is the time to be honest with your healthcare provider. Leaving out key details about your usage may cause you to not get the help that you actually need.

There are also symptoms that you may have already experienced that signal that detox is necessary. These include loss of appetite, abdominal pains, fever, sweats, blood pressure or heart rate irregularities, mood swings, anxiety, irritability, depression, restlessness, poor concentration, insomnia, and paranoia.

3. Is Detox Painful?

This is probably the most common question asked about detox. This has much to do with how detox is depicted on TV and in movies. Fortunately, there have been tremendous advances when it comes to recovery and medically-supervised detox. Many individuals who complete detox will tell you that their experience was not as bad as they thought it would be. Of course, some have painful and unpleasant symptoms.

What is important to remember is that detox is an intense experience, and it isn’t easy to break old, destructive habits and experience the physical withdrawal as toxins leave the body. Different substances present varying detox symptoms. This is why it’s so vital to get help at a medically supervised detox center.

At Summit Estate’s medical detox program, we regularly monitor your symptoms and vitals and most importantly, we strive to keep you as safe and as comfortable as possible.

4. How Long Does Detox Last?

This is another very common question because there are no set guidelines. Just as symptoms can vary, so can the length of the detox process. In general, the longer you’ve been using the substance, the longer the detox process will take. If you’ve done any internet research on the topic of detox, you probably noticed a variety of average lengths of time. However, most of these fall into the range of several days to several weeks.

5. What Happens After Detox?

This may be the most important question of all! It’s very important to know that detox is only the first step in the recovery process and is never considered to be a stand-alone treatment option. Once you’ve achieved physical stabilization and are substance-free, it’s time to enter a recovery program that can help you understand triggers that led to the addiction, overcome cravings, and build a new life that will help sustain your goal of lifelong recovery.

Start On Your Journey To Healing And Recovery

A safe and comfortable detox is available to you through our medical detox program in Northern CA. We will create a customized rehabilitation plan for your individual needs and goals. Why not take the first step in recovery? Our caring and professional staff is waiting for your call.

To Begin Your Journey To Healing And Recovery – Call Now!

Find Pain Medication Detox Programs in the Santa Cruz, CA Area

Pain medication detox programs in Santa Cruz CA area provide individuals with a way to overcome their addiction to prescription medication.  Addiction to prescription drugs including pain medication is on the rise in the United States.  While pain medication has benefits when taken as prescribed, taking large doses of medication or taking medication that was not prescribed by a physician can easily lead to an addiction.  Despite their best intentions, people who are addicted to pain medication can find it nearly impossible to overcome their addiction without professional assistance.

prescription-pill-addictionLuxury drug addiction programs provide individuals with a comfortable environment where they can get away from the stress in their lives and focus on their recovery. Located in a serene setting, pain medication detox programs in Santa Cruz CA area provide the perfect backdrop for addiction recovery.  When searching for the right pain medication detox programs in Santa Cruz CA area, be sure to evaluate the following:

Amenities

When a person feels comfortable in their environment they are more likely to relax and to be open to the addiction recovery process.  Amenities help clients feel at home and provide an outlet for relaxation and restoration after a day of intensive therapy.  Additionally, amenities add further value to the addiction recovery process, allow clients to experience positive events while sober as a way to identify their interests.  Take care to find an addiction treatment with amenities that will best allow you to feel at home and focus on your recovery.

Personal Attention

A center’s staff to client ratio determines how much individual attention each client receives.  Centers with low staff to client ratios will not have the resources or the bandwidth to provide a personalized experience.  Well-staffed centers have the ability to focus on the specific needs of each client in order to equip them with the tools they need for remaining sober after they leave treatment.  Involving clients in their recovery plan both engages them in the process and ensures the program meets their personal goals and objectives for treatment.  Look for a center that has the ability to focus on their clients as individuals.

Treatment Style

Non 12 step programs are well suited for many individuals.  Rational Recovery, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and SMART Recovery provide alternatives to the 12 step approach. Individuals who have been unsuccessful with 12 step programs or who do not wish to partake in group meetings often find benefit with a non 12 step program.  Consider what types of treatment would be the best fit for your personality and lifestyle, then look for a program that matches your needs.

Family Programs

The effects of addictive behavior can be seen in the lives of the addicted person’s family.  It is important that family is involved in the recovery process.  This way, the addicted person and the family can heal together.  Additionally, it helps to create a positive environment to return to after leaving inpatient treatment.

Summit Estate Recovery Center provides luxury pain medication detox programs in Santa Cruz CA with a focus on the specific needs of each client.  Their practice is limited to six inpatient clients at a time who are served by a team of 30 addiction experts.  These experts work together to ensure that clients have the tools they need to remain sober after leaving the residential program.  During their stay at Summit Estate’s facility, clients enjoy a number of amenities that include:

  • Exercise center with a personal trainer
  • Yoga studio with instruction by a master yogi
  • Spa facilities with sauna and Jacuzzi
  • Available massage and acupuncture
  • Luxuriously appointed accommodations
  • Gourmet meals freshly prepared daily

addiction-to-xanaxIt is in this comfortable environment where clients receive the highest quality pain medication detox programs in Santa Cruz CA area.  The personalized care begins during the intake process, where the Summit Estate team learns more about each client as an individual.  Next, each client experiences a medically controlled, personalized detoxification protocol.  Using a medically controlled process allows Summit Estate clients to avoid the pain and discomfort commonly associated with withdrawal from pain medication.   This allows clients to begin their recovery process sooner.

For additional information on the pain medication detox programs in Santa Cruz CA area provided by Summit Estate, contact them today.  Please complete the form linked below and a member of the Summit Estate team will reach out to you. Or, simply call 800-701-6997 to speak with a member of the admissions team directly.  Thank you.

Pain Medication Detox Programs in Santa Cruz Ca Area

Pain medication detox programs in Santa Cruz CA area allow clients to detox in a comfortable and controlled manner.  By eliminating the pain and discomfort that are commonly associated by the detox and withdrawal process, clients are able to focus on their recovery and begin their treatment sooner.  There are several things to look for while selecting the pain medication detox programs in Santa Cruz CA area that are best suited for your needs.

Staff to Client Ratio

drug-rehab-bay-area-CAA personal approach to pain medication detox programs in Santa Cruz CA area helps provide clients with the support needed to identify and address the root cause of their addictive behavior.  Often, these breakthroughs come through intensive one on one treatment sessions and counseling.  A center with a high staff to client ratio will have the staff needed to focus on one on one interaction.  Additionally, having specialized individualizes to that can address different needs such as exercise, nutrition and mental health aids in the recovery process.

Amenities

In order to feel comfortable during the treatment process the right treatment center will provide a number of amenities.  Amenities allow clients the ability to rest and reflect after day of intensive inpatient treatment.  When a client feels comfortable, they are more likely to open up and to give all of themselves toward recovery.

Type of Treatment Program

No two people are the same.  Therefore, it is important that treatment be customized to the unique needs of each individual.  While twelve step programs are successful for some individuals, they are not the answer for everyone.  Alternative methods such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, CBT, provide a different approach that may better suit a number of individuals.  For people who have been unsuccessful with treatment with a twelve step approach may find an alternative method better suited for their needs.   If your lifestyle is not conducive to regular attendance of meetings or you wish to avoid a faith based approach, an alternative method may better suit your road to recovery.

Insurance and Payment Options

While the cost of treatment should not be the only factor in the decision to select a pain medication detox programs in Santa Cruz area, it is certainly a concern for many.  A center that accepts insurance plans can make a significant difference in a client’s out of pocket cost.  Take care to understand if your medical insurance provides benefits for inpatient treatment.  If so, look for centers that accept your insurance coverage.  Additionally, finance options with flexible payment terms may make your chosen facility more affordable.  Be sure to ask about payment options when evaluating treatment programs.

Summit Estate Recovery Center provides individualized treatment and pain medication detox programs in Santa Cruz CA area.  Their six bed facility has an unmatched staff to client ratio which allows each client to receive the one on one interaction and attention that is necessary for long term sobriety.  By tailoring addiction treatment plans to the needs of each client, Summit Estate is able to set the foundation clients need to deal with stress and cravings.   A luxury treatment center, Summit Estate offers a number of amenities for client comfort including:

  • Luxurious accommodations with private and semi-private bedrooms and professionally styled bathrooms
  • Comfortable community areas for socialization and relaxation
  • A natural setting completed by hiking trails and fishing pond
  • Delicious gourmet meals made fresh daily by the in house chef
  • Internet access and communications center
  • Yoga studio with instruction
  • Exercise facilities and personal trainer
  • Spa that includes sauna and hot tub

inpatient-drug-rehabsBy creating a comfortable environment in a serene setting, Summit Estate allows clients to feel at home so they can focus on their recovery.   The treatment team at Summit Estate takes time to understand each client’s issues and to customize their pain medication detox programs in Santa Cruz to ensure clients achieve their personal goals for recovery.  When clients are involved in their treatment they are more likely to be successful and have lifelong sobriety.

To receive additional information on Summit Estate’s pain medication detox programs in Santa Cruz CA area, contact them today.  Please complete the form linked below and a member of the Summit Estate team will contact you.  Or, please call 800-701-6997 to speak directly with a Summit Estate admissions counselor.  Thank you.

Centers For Treating Substance Abuse and Mental Illness

Substance Abuse and Mental Illness Treatment in California

Dual diagnosis treatment simultaneously addresses substance abuse and the underlying mental illness.  For individuals that have both issues, it is important to fully address them simultaneously during inpatient treatment.  Otherwise, the chance for relapsing into drug abuse is extremely high.   Because of this, people with dual diagnosis treatment needs must find a center that is equipped to address both concerns at the same time.

find-help-for-alcohol-addictionIt is common for people to have both a drug addiction and mental health issue.  In fact, in many instances one causes the other.  Some people with mental health issues use drugs to self-medicate their symptoms.  Additionally, some individuals who have drug addictions experience mental health symptoms because of their drug use.

Located in the Bay Area, Summit Estate Recovery Center provides dual diagnosis treatment.  Their programs focus on understanding the unique needs of each individual and providing each one with the specific care they need to recover.  This is particularly true for those individuals who have a dual diagnosis.  It is imperative that they are allowed to receive the medical care necessary to address their mental health needs while recovering from addiction.   Summit Estate is uniquely able to do this due to their unmatched staff to client ratio.  Their practice is limited to six inpatient clients at a time who work closely with the center’s 30 staff members.   These individuals work together to stop the cycle of addiction when there is an addiction and mental health issue:

  • Person takes their drug of choice
  • Due to ingesting the drug, the person’s brain is flooded with neurotransmitters
  • The person experiences a high due to the increased neurotransmitters
  • The brain attempts to find equilibrium and purges the neurotransmitters from its tissue.  This includes the neurotransmitters which are naturally made and stored by the body.
  • The person comes down off of their high
  • Because of the depleted neurotransmitters, the individual is unable to feel pleasure, resulting in depression and anxiety.
  • In order to self-medicate these feelings the person takes their drug of choice.

To receive additional information on the dual diagnosis treatment program at Summit Estate, contact them today.  To do so, please complete the information form using the link below.  Or, please call 800-701-6997.  Thank you.