Tag Archives: Alcohol Abuse

Men, Alcohol and Abuse

Often, in articles and posts about men and alcohol, you see numbers, such as how many drinks per day are “safe” for a man (which varies according to what source you use.) The amount for a woman is usually listed as well. Or, you might find information on the effect of alcohol on a man’s fertility, for example. But this post is comes after the start of the #MeToo movement, so it’s about the violence that occurs when certain men drink, especially those in positions of power. It’s a topic that has been in the news lately. It’s also relevant in a blog on addiction since high-level executives are occasionally in the news for alcohol use disorder.

Note: It’s well-established that women, as well, can be violent when they drink. This is not to excuse them or say that only men are violent when they drink. And couples can become violent with each other when they drink to excess. But again, this post is informed by the #MeToo movement.

Powerful Men Drinking

One noted journalist who recently wrote an article called “First the Drinks, Then the Hitting,” in the hard copy of The New York Times (online copy may have a different headline), began by mentioning “educated, affluent” women and “a certain cultural panic” that exists around the amount of their drinking (and is often written or talked about in the media). “There is no corollary for men from a similar demographic position,” she says. Indeed, Eric Schneiderman’s “fall from grace” – he was the New York attorney general before he resigned– brought to the forefront the problem of affluent and powerful men drinking and becoming physically abusive toward several women. One of his accusers noted that he was a heavy drinker—having two bottles of wine and then taking a bottle of Scotch into the bedroom and getting “plastered,” which happened five nights a week according to her. (Why the girlfriends stayed with him is head-scratching, but that’s a subject for another time.)

Drug and Alcohol Rehab Programs

Alcohol Intervention

There’s an unspoken supposition in magazines and other media today, according to the article. Women are depicted as worried about going too far when they drink, as a result of the pressures of work and parenthood, while men’s magazines “still pay reverence to the cocktail culture [for men].” The underlying assumption is that men who have succeeded know something about self-regulation, but apparently many don’t. Schneiderman is not the only powerful man to be accused of physically abusing girlfriends or wives; there’s also former White House aide Rob Porter and Silicon Valley entrepreneur Abhishek Gattani, but the others weren’t described as being inebriated when the abuse allegedly happened.

Drug and Alcohol Rehab Programs

Schneiderman has tried to say that he was engaged in consensual relationships involving role playing or rough sex. But in an article on bondage, dominance, sadism and masochism, practitioners say that his sexual encounters and those of former Governor Eric Greitens of Missouri “bear little resemblance to consensual B.D.S.M. encounters.” Not only that, B.D.S.M practitioners warn against “partaking in violent sexual activity while drinking alcohol or taking drugs.” You can cause serious damage if you don’t have your faculties about you. The World Health Organization calls this type of abuse Intimate Partner Violence and says that alcohol consumption, especially at harmful and hazardous levels, is a major contributor. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism says, “Individuals with alcohol problems attack more frequently, are more likely to inflict serious injury, are more likely to commit sexual assaults, and are more likely to be violent outside of the home than are batterers without a substance abuse history.” More people need to get the message and know that they’ll be prosecuted when victims comes forward. For more information on our drug and alcohol rehab programs please call (866) 569-9391.

Let’s Talk about Drinking

With the opioid crisis still going strong, there’s a danger of problem drinking getting short shrift. If you’re the one who’s desperately trying to stay sober, or if you’re the one in four who has been personally touched by alcohol use disorder in your family, you know that we need to keep it in the public eye. It’s that important. To give people hope for recovery, and for funding for treatment and for research, and to educate people, to name a few reasons. Time Goes By is one of the many personal blogs that touches on drinking to excess. In one post, on Elders and Alcohol, the writer recalls growing up in the fifties when alcohol was such a big part of many people’s lives, and a more accepted part. The woman’s father had taught her to make all the popular drinks by the time she was 10, which would be unheard of today. In later years, she realized that her mother was a functional alcoholic who kept it in check at her day job, but made up for it evenings and weekends. She didn’t inherit the gene, the writer says, and doesn’t have a problem with alcohol.

Alcohol Addiction

A number of people felt the need to comment on the post. One believed there’s a similar emphasis on drinking today, as if it has never dissipated, from the media touting the latest craft beer to “paint and drink parties,” to people posting pictures of their drinks on social media. Others felt the need to testify about their personal experience, from abstaining to social drinking, to bringing one’s own beverages to events because the person was finally able to quit drinking and didn’t want to go back. The blog writer includes several excerpts from Medical News Today, a U.K. news site, about how moderate drinking is beneficial. She obviously hadn’t read the article that appeared before her post did—Federal Agency Courted Alcohol Industry to Fund Study on Benefits of Moderate Drinking. It concerns exactly what was spelled out in the headline. Not to cast aspersions on anyone or any study, but we need to research who is funding studies. The article revealed that some people involved “already believed that moderate alcohol is a good thing,” which is also not a good thing.  Luckily, another article, which followed that one, reported that the N.I.H would be investigating outreach to alcohol companies, or examining whether health officials violated government policy by soliciting donations to fund the study of moderate drinking. And following that, another, international study, found that adults should average no more than one drink a day—that many countries’ guidelines are too lenient. Yet according to that blog writer quoting Medical News Today, various studies indicated that light-to-moderate alcohol consumption may lower the risk of stroke in women, and regular, moderate wine drinking might reduce the risk of developing depression, and moderate wine and beer consumption reduces the risk of cardiovascular events.

Summit Estate's alcohol recovery centers

Alcohol Recovery Center

With all the reports about alcohol, it can be hard to determine what’s true regarding the claims. However, no one can argue that if a person doesn’t stop drinking, alcohol use disorder is extremely dangerous. People in recovery occasionally mention not knowing what to say when people ask why they’re not drinking. A person who wrote into a social etiquette column said that one co-worker said he missed drinking with the person, and asked if he wouldn’t have just one drink with him. The writer said that his recovery group suggested he didn’t owe anyone any answers. The columnist responded in line with the group—the writer had no duty to explain himself, especially if he were new in recovery. His message was to focus on himself and not waste energy fending off pals. But the columnist suggested that as time goes on, saying something like “Drinking didn’t agree with me” to acquaintances is good, but to family and close friends, it’s OK to share more of his struggle, which might even give him more allies than just his support group. For more information on alcohol addiction or Summit Estate’s alcohol recovery centers please contact  (866) 569-9391.

Binge Drinking In College: What You Need To Know

College LectureAlthough studies suggest underage drinking, including binge drinking, is on the decline, the fight to curb alcohol consumption among college students is far from finished. The same data that shows that underage binge drinking is down cannot confirm that the situation has gotten significantly better for college-aged Americans.

In general, heavy alcohol consumption among college students impacts a wide variety of people beyond the ones doing the drinking. Those who can be affected negatively include, but are not limited to:

  • Parents of those students
  • Deans and other university officials
  • Campus and local police
  • Residents and property owners near the campus

College drinking typically takes place at the following locations: fraternity parties, residence halls, athletic events (tailgating, most likely), off-campus housing areas, bars and restaurants near campus, and in or nearby concert venues. The farther the drinking location is from campus, the higher probability a student will drive drunk or ride with somebody who’s intoxicated as they make their way back toward the school.

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Are You Drinking Too Much?

Are You Drinking Too Much-Help For Alcohol AddictionAre you worried that you may have a problem with alcohol? Has your loved one’s partying progressed past the point of social drinking into the danger zone? If so, you’re not alone. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIHAA), approximately seven percent of all men and women 18 years and older are considered to have an alcohol use disorder.

Alcoholism Can Sneak Up On Anyone

Alcoholism by its very nature is a condition that sneaks up on individuals and can overtake their lives. Before there is full realization of the problem by the person or their loved ones, the damage can already be significant. It’s not uncommon for an alcoholic to suffer serious setbacks such as losing a job, the breakup of a relationship, or severe health consequences, before the first conversation about treatment happens.

Signs You Are Drinking Too Much

Alcoholism is not something to sweep under the rug or to avoid discussing. It’s a progressive disease that only gets worse over time. Because of this, if there are indicators that alcohol is becoming an issue, now is the time to get help.

How can you tell if alcohol is becoming a problem? The following are top 10 signs you may need to visit a rehab center:

  • Daily drinking
  • Increased consumption and tolerance
  • Drinking alone
  • Alcohol is used for stress-relief
  • DUI
  • Lying about or hiding usage
  • Defensiveness
  • Problems with or missing work or school
  • Frequent hangovers
  • Blackouts

Getting Help For Alcohol Addiction

If these signs or others are present, the next step is getting help. Yet, this isn’t always easy because denial of the condition is a hallmark of someone who suffers from alcohol addiction. Because of this, it’s wise to seek outside opinions and professional help.

For many, the best source of help can be found at a personalized treatment recovery center like Summit Estate. For some, this may mean outpatient treatment. For others, the road to recovery may include intensive detoxification and residential treatment.

At Summit Estate, we use proven methods to treat alcoholism in a private, comfortable environment. With a high staff-to-client ratio, we are able to provide a personalized treatment plan for those starting on their journey of recovery.

If you are seeking alcohol addiction treatment in CA, call us now. We will be with you every step of the way.

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