Tag Archives: Tips and Tricks

How To Kick An Addiction While Building
A Career

Ways To Kick Addiction While Building A CareerDrugs, alcohol and work don’t mix. At one time, hiding a bottle of Scotch or a handful of pills in a desk drawer for an afternoon high was conveniently overlooked by employers. Today, addictions are surefire career killers. If you find yourself experiencing the torment of addiction while trying to hold down a serious fulltime job, you know you’re walking a treacherous tightrope. How many times can you call in sick or show up late for work before you get called into the boss’s office or the human resources department? How many excuses can you invent for your lengthy lunches or extended coffee breaks? As the work piles up and your performance dips down, you try to bluff your way through another miserable week at work hoping no one will notice you’re drowning with no hope in sight.

Addiction On The Job

Many hardworking career professionals suffer from the disease of addiction. Trying to navigate recovery and maintain your career path can be very tricky indeed. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, more than 90 percent of alcoholics are functional. These include many high-paid professionals such as executives, physicians, entrepreneurs and even pilots. What all of these individuals have in common besides addiction is the ability to hide their struggles from coworkers, friends and loved ones.

“…more than 90 percent of alcoholics are functional.”

Overcoming The Denial Of Addiction

Many functioning addicts tell themselves that they’re ok because they pay their bills on time and are employed. Some drink only the finest wines or choose to use opioid painkillers prescribed from top-rated physicians. It’s easy to be in denial when you’re not on the streets struggling to find the cash for your next fix. It’s also a fact that high-functioning addicts often spend years or even decades in denial. The problem is often made worse by family or friends who either fail to recognize or choose not to confront the problem.

Ways To Maintain Your Career While Overcoming Addiction

The good news is that many individuals manage to sustain their career and even achieve greater heights of success when they embrace recovery. In fact, there are many treatment options for professionals who need help with drug abuse or alcoholism. Outpatient Programs: One option that is particularly beneficial for busy professionals is outpatient treatment that is scheduled around work and other responsibilities. An outpatient program offers personalized, on-going support as an individual continues in their career. Outpatient programs typically have a variety of treatment options that fit into a busy work schedule, including group and family counseling and 12-step meetings. Internet Recovery Forums: Another flexible option that can help you kick an addiction are internet-based recovery forums such as Recovery.org/forums and SoberRecovery.com/forums. Although these types of forums can help you stay positively focused and offer supplemental support, they are no substitute for tangible, professional addiction treatment.

Are You A Busy Professional Struggling With Addiction?

The first step in overcoming addiction is breaking through the denial and asking for help. There are plenty of other professionals just like you who have already asked for help and are now enjoying a more productive, balanced life free from addiction. You’re not alone. It’s time to take control of your life so that you can stay focused on your career, your family and the many other things that are truly important in life. If you’re ready to finally get control of your addiction, call Summit Estate now to speak with an addiction specialist. We focus on each individual’s personal needs and goals and create a customized treatment plan that will work.

Learn more about our San Jose outpatient drug and alcohol programs below.

Outpatient Program

How Certain Ways Of Thinking Can Be A Trigger For Relapse

When it comes to sustaining long-term recovery after addiction treatment, it’s important to avoid those triggers that put you at greater risk of returning to drugs or alcohol. Much of the treatment process is about learning how to identify and avoid these people, places and things that can set off an urge to use. While, it’s obvious to avoid the bar that used to be your favorite haunt or stay away from those people who first turned you on to drugs, it’s not always easy to turn off thought processes that can trigger a relapse.

The Power Of Thoughts

In 12 step meetings, there’s a common saying that sums up the power of thinking in terms of addiction. “Your head is a dangerous neighborhood; try not to go there alone.”

You may have already caught yourself heading down a dangerous path with your thoughts. Often, they can start with romanticizing using drugs or alcohol. You may think about the “good times” you had without clearly considering the reality of your addiction and the impact it has had on your life. This is referred to as euphoric recall, and it is dangerous thinking, indeed! Simply thinking of drinking or using drugs can start this process and enable thoughts to turn to cravings.

Fortunately, we all have the power to take control of our thoughts to avoid “thinking triggers” to turn into a relapse.

Ways To Manage Your Thoughts To Prevent RelapseSmall Changes, Big Difference-Ways To Prevent Relapse

The following simple, yet powerful tips can help you manage your thoughts and can serve as an important component of relapse prevention.

Follow The Thought Through The Logical Conclusion

One of the most powerful tips to avoid relapse is to take a trigger-promoting thought through its conclusion. In other words, consider the honest, real outcome of returning to using or drinking. Sure, it may seem like having a glass of wine is not a big deal and can help you unwind. However, one glass of wine could turn into two and easily into an entire bottle, a hangover the next day and disappointment in yourself and from loved ones who have been supportive of your recovery. It’s not wise to only consider the benefit of that glass of wine. In fact, it’s a trap. Work through the realistic path of what happens to allow your brain to realize that drinking or using is not a good idea.

Proactively Tell Your Mind To Stop

This is a technique that cognitive therapists often recommend to patients who are struggling with negative thinking. Yes, it is as simple as telling your mind to stop the thoughts. It may even be necessary to visualize a stop sign or other symbol of halting something. Then, move on to a way to distract yourself. This can be by reading a book, watching a movie, exercising, walking/playing fetch with your dog or talking with a friend.

Share Your Thoughts

Like the saying goes about the bad neighborhood, don’t go there alone. In other words, rely on your support system when you begin having negative thoughts. Talk them out with others in recovery. Go to a meeting. The key is not to ruminate on your thoughts alone which only causes them to grow. Disable your thoughts by sharing them with others!

Get Help Now!

Are you struggling with addiction and need treatment? Have you relapsed and want help returning to recovery? Don’t go it alone! Call Summit Estate now to speak with an addiction specialist. We’re here to help you live a life free from the grip of addiction.

25 Ways To Reward Yourself – Without Alcohol Or Drugs – For Recovery Milestones

It’s important to reward yourself for your accomplishments during your recovery, whether for behavioral changes and/or milestones in sobriety. The purpose of rewarding yourself is to strengthen your resolve to keep alcohol and drugs out of your life. Rewarding yourself increases your awareness of all that you have accomplished.

Here are 25 ideas of ways you can give yourself a pat on the back for reaching certain milestones in your recovery.

Ways To Reward Yourself Without Alcohol Or Drugs

Ways To Reward Yourself Without Alcohol Or Drugs

  1. Begin a “Success Savings.” Put $1 away for every day you have stayed sober or put $2 for each recovery meeting attended. You decide the amount of money you give yourself for the desired action. At the end of a year, take the money and use it towards a mini-vacation.
  1. Buy or make a special piece of jewelry. A bracelet, necklace, earrings or rings will do. Every time you wear the new item, you’ll be reminded of how far you have come since you have gotten sober.
  1. Begin a collection. It can be stamps, thimbles, spoons, dolls, action figures, sports memorabilia, etc. Each time you achieve a sobriety milestone (30, 60 or 90 days, 6 months, 9 months, 1 year, etc.), go ahead and buy another item for your collection.
  1. Get a massage. It’s relaxing and will reenergize you from the inside out. A little pampering can go a long way.
  1. Get your hair styled, dyed, or cut. Try something daring. Have fun and experiment with your new look.
  1. Get a makeover with a professional. When you look good on the outside, you feel good on the inside.
  1. Pamper yourself with a manicure and pedicure. If you need to watch what you spend, do it yourself at home.
  1. Have a night out at the movies with a friend you haven’t seen for a while. Self-explanatory. Who doesn’t enjoy a good night out at the movie theater, especially with someone you need to catch up with.
  1. Enjoy a leisurely morning at the park. Breathe and take in the fresh air. Feed the ducks. Watch the children play. Get in tune with the simpler things in life.
  1. Attend an art show, a gallery or your local museum. Check your local paper or news website for the exhibitions in your area.
  1. Be a kid again! Go to your local amusement park and recapture the “awe” that you felt as a child.
  1. Buy yourself a new outfit. If you are low on funds, go thrift store shopping.
  1. Redecorate a room in your house. Let your creativity flow. Let the room capture the real you. Don’t be afraid to go a little wild. If you don’t have money to redecorate, you can just rearrange the space.
  1. See your favorite sports team play live. Reward yourself with the best seats you can afford.
  1. Do something daring. Make it something you’ve always wanted to try. Go bungee jumping, hang gliding, parachuting, whitewater rafting, etc.
  1. Get a new tattoo (or piercing). Get something that’s uniquely you.
  1. Have a long, relaxing bubble bath. Light some candles around the tub and make it serene and memorable.
  1. Buy a new book. Schedule some uninterrupted time to read it.
  1. Sign up for a team sport such as softball, basketball or hockey. You’ll have fun and maybe meet some new friends!
  1. Rent a boat or Jet Ski. Spend the day soaking up some sunshine and riding the waves with family and friends.
  1. Go to a concert or theatrical event. Do this especially if it’s something you’ve wanted to see, and if it falls around a certain recovery milestone.
  1. Take a cooking class. If you can’t afford a cooking class, then look up a fun recipe online or YouTube a recipe and try it at home.
  1. Try an architecture tour or some other “tourist” activity in your own city. You’ll get a new appreciation for your hometown.
  1. Start a new routine when you get home from work. Instead of rewarding yourself with a drink when you get home from work, have some hot herbal tea, light a scented candle and read some recovery literature.
  1. Announce your accomplishments and sobriety milestones to others. Allow yourself to hear and soak in the congratulations! It is a big deal that you are in recovery and have changed your life. You deserve the praise.

Written by: Sarah F. Scott, CADC-CAS – Outpatient Counselor

Exposure To Triggers And How To Avoid Them

On the long journey of recovery, there will be many twists and turns. The challenges of life that affect all of us can be more difficult to navigate when you’re in recovery. In fact, they can sometimes lead to relapses that can result in a return to an addiction.

Tough Times Never Last-How To Avoid Triggers-SummitEstate.comMost addiction experts will tell you that symptoms of post-acute withdrawal can last two years or longer. During this time, those in recovery are more likely to re-embrace unhealthy, dysfunctional behaviors that led to addiction. The possibility of relapse is very real.

Yet, the process of working through the early stages of recovery are necessary to reach the state where long-term recovery truly becomes a journey that will last forever. The key is being able to work through life’s unexpected situations and identify the triggers that they can create.

By understanding these triggers and learning how to stop the stages of relapse before they start, recovery becomes easier to sustain.

Common Triggers And What To Do To Combat Them

The following are some common triggers that can threaten recovery. Anyone who is focused on staying sober should be on guard for any of these warning signs of a possible relapse.

Self-Pity – Not taking ownership for choices and feeling like a victim.
Dishonesty – Telling small lies to family, friends or employers can be a slippery slope that can lead to being untruthful about working your program or remaining sober.
Depression ­– Feelings of despair can often happen in cycles. These need to be addressed and treated.
Frustration – Not everything is going to go your way in recovery. Coping skills are required to successfully sustain recovery.
Fatigue – It’s important to avoid becoming over tired. Recovery is largely rooted in embracing good self-care behaviors such as adequate rest, balanced nutrition, and regular exercise.
Impatience – When you’re taking life day-by-day or even minute-by-minute, recovery can seem excruciatingly drawn-out. Instead of focusing on how it’s not going fast enough, it’s important to stay in the moment.
Complacency – Letting up on the vigilance and discipline required for recovery can quickly lead to a relapse. Being committed to taking a daily inventory, 12-step meetings, therapy, meditation and other positive activities can help minimize triggers and the chance of a relapse.

You’re Not Alone – We Will Be With You On Your Journey

Have you or a loved one had a relapse? You’re not alone, and help is available. Don’t try and tackle this problem alone. Our caring and professional staff will treat you with the respect and dignity that you deserve. We will also create a personalized treatment program made just for you.

Call Us Now To See How We Can Help You Break The Cycle Of Addiction!