a woman asks her therapist what are co-occurring disorders

What Are Co-Occurring Disorders?

What are co-occurring disorders? A person who is struggling with substance abuse and a mental disorder has a co-occurring disorder. According to the National Survey of Drug Use and Health, nearly 6 million people in the U.S. have some form of co-occurring disorders.  To provide proper treatment, many addiction treatment centers in California offer a…

a man looks at a shot glass and considers the effects of alcohol and anxiety

The Connection Between Alcohol and Anxiety

There are days when you feel like everything is happening all at once. That project you’ve been working on for months suddenly comes up with major snags, you and your significant other are fighting all the time, and your washing machine broke down again. When dealing with such stressful situations, you might want to have…

Can Psychedelics Like Mushrooms Be Used To Treat Mental Health, Addiction Disorders?

So-called “Magic Mushrooms” are now legal in a couple major cities and this development has many in the mental health and addiction recovery fields wondering about what this means. Is the decriminalization of a previously “scheduled” drug a sign of impending harm on those who partake, or do these substances actually have utility in treating…

What is EMDR Therapy and How Does it Relate to Addiction?

EMDR stands for Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing and is a way to help people work through traumatic life events. WebMD explains it’s a nontraditional therapy that’s growing in popularity, especially for treating PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder, which people can experience after military combat, physical assault, rape, or car accidents.) Note that because it’s non-traditional,…

How to Set Appropriate Boundaries with Loved Ones Struggling With Addiction

If you’re at all knowledgeable about addiction (such as if you know it’s officially called substance use disorder), you likely know about sober family members being called codependent, and the need to set boundaries with a person drinking to excess or taking drugs. Otherwise, you’re “enabling,” not helping, which is not healthy for you, either.…